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IWCT: French office

Series consists of correspondence relating to the creation of the French office and to the first and second sessions of the International War Crimes Tribunal as well as reports, member lists, and pamphlets. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The French office and the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation experienced difficulties in cooperating in the multi-national Tribunal. Letters, memos, and notes in this single file record some of the difficulties - as well as the achievements."

IWCT: General correspondence (by country)

Series consists of correspondence with individuals and organizations offering support for the International War Crimes Tribunal, relating to the subject of anti-war campaigns occurring internationally, and requesting the participation of Russell in anti-war activities. Also includes typescript copies of statements, bulletins, and news clippings filed with related letters as well as typescript copies and some photocopies of outgoing correspondence.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “Whereas [series] 376 is organized in one alphabetical sequence, Russell and his Foundation had the following material organized by country. There is considerable overlap in content between [series] 376 and [series] 377. [Series] 377 unaccountably ends with Japan - unless it be supposed that [series] 376 contains the correspondence that should have comprised the remainder of [series] 377."

IWCT: Investigation teams and witnesses

Series consists of correspondence with individuals who served on the International War Crimes Tribunal's investigation teams in South East Asia regarding conditions in Vietnam, trip planning, and finances relating to the investigations. Also includes reports, statements, and articles about the investigations' findings. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “These files are of great importance for their first-hand reports of conditions in Vietnam. Many were never published. The background correspondence demonstrates the difficulties of preparing the major investigative effort which was the Tribunal."

IWCT: Members' correspondence on Czechoslovakia

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “In September 1968 Russell organized a declaration regarding the worsening situation in Czechoslovakia. He later organized a conference on the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, involving several of the Tribunal members.”

Includes correspondence relating to the International War Crimes Tribunal's activities in response to the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Also includes signed declarations by IWCT members. Letters from Russell are typescript copies.

IWCT: Members’ correspondence

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “ Correspondence between Russell and his staff and various persons who were members of the [International War Crimes] Tribunal. The files reveal that the idea of the Tribunal was first put forth in 1965. The correspondence ends in 1968 with Russell still hopeful for peace in Vietnam. He wrote to Gunther Anders: 'The present generation of Americans is, after all, the first to challenge the fundamental premises of the Cold War. The resurrection of critical thinking in the American universities offers some promise for the future.'" Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; also includes photocopies of some incoming correspondence.

IWCT: Printed material

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “[Series] 385 fills fifteen boxes with assorted printed material on Vietnam and the reception of the Tribunal. Some of the documents are unpublished; they include some correspondence.” Also includes material about the activities and sessions of the International War Crimes Tribunal including reports, statements, testimonies, essays and articles, agendas, and members lists. Letters from Russell are typescript copies.

IWCT: Refusals

Series consists of correspondence with individuals who were invited to serve on the International War Crimes Tribunal, but refused to do so. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The success of the Tribunal depended partly on the personages who would agree to serve on it. Of particular interest are the reasons given by those [included in this series] for declining to serve. Many supported the purpose of the Tribunal but considered themselves too partisan to be of use."

IWCT: Working correspondence with Vietnamese

Series consists of correspondence relating to the presence of American troops in Southern Vietnam, alleged American war crimes in Vietnam, and the fight for Vietnam's independence. Notable is correspondence with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam's president, Ho Chi Minh, regarding the International War Crimes Tribunal. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies and photocopies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The earliest item from Ho Chi Minh is dated 10 August 1964. The thick files indicate the symbolic importance of Russell's solidarity with the Vietnamese struggle for independence."

Independent Labour Party

Series includes letters from Independent Labour Party members, invitations for Russell to lecture at meetings, a news clipping, and other letters relating to general matters of the ILP. Also includes Russell's 1919 ILP membership card; he had joined the ILP in 1917. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Invitations to Lecture, attend functions and dinners, etc.

This series consists of invitations to lecture, attend functions and dinners, sponsor organizations, etc., largely from 1950 onward. Includes typescript copies of replies from Russell, Chris Farley, and Ralph Schoenman. Acquired as part of Archives 1 and 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states: "The invitations filed here are public invitations-mainly to make speeches and attend ceremonies. Some of the invitations came from organizations with which Russell had been associated long ago, such as the Cambridge Heretics. To some he sent messages to be read and possibly published. These files supplement the publishing and political correspondences, which also contain many invitations. The Trinity College, entry contains the business correspondence (mainly form letters) resulting from Russell's life fellowship."

Labour Party

Series consists of letters from the Labour Party relating to Russell's participation in the House of Lords and his membership in the Labour Party, circulars, the annual report for 1962, an official response to Russell's resignation as a party member in 1965 due to policy regarding Vietnam, and six of Russell's Labour Party membership cards dated between 1951 and 1964. Russell had contested the Chelsea riding for Labour in 1922.

Legal Correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's legal firm, Coward, Chance & Co., relating Russell's letting of Telegraph House from his brother, 1927-1931; divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora, 1932-1935, as well as custody and schooling for their children, John and Kate, 1932-1936 (as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “this part of the correspondence is sometimes annotated by Russell in ball-point pen”); the mental health of Russell's eldest son John, 1960, 1964; custody, education, and finances of his grandchildren, Anne, Sarah, and Lucy (children of John Conrad and Susan Russell), 1961-1969; Russell's and Edith's week long imprisonment in Brixton Prison for the Committee of 100's anti-nuclear demonstrations, 1961; wills drafted for Russell and Edith, 1963; a legal amendment to the parentage of Harriet Russell (Dora Russell's daughter by Griffin Barry); and other matters. Also noted in the print finding aid: “Crompton Llewelyn Davies was Russell's chief contact” at Coward, Chance & Co. “until his death in 1935; L.E.P. Tylor succeeded him.”

Legal actions: Barnes Case (1940-1945)

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s legal case against Dr. Alfred Barnes and the Barnes Foundation for dismissing him from his position as a lecturer at the Foundation. Dr. Barnes had recruited Russell to begin lecturing in January 1941 but ended up dismissing him in December 1942. Russell won his breach of contract suit and was awarded $20,000 in unpaid salary. Included in the series are: Russell's correspondence with Dr. Barnes and his Foundation, which gives insight into the state of their professional relationship; correspondence with Russell's lawyers; news clippings and legal documents. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Legal actions: City College of New York

Series contains material relating to the aftermath of the February 1940 announcement that Russell had been appointed to a professorship at the City College of New York. Many on the American right rallied to oppose the appointment, and a civil suit was launched against the College. Ultimately, the appointment never occurred. Included are: correspondence with the College and other academics and members of the legal profession; letters of support or abuse from the public; news clippings about Russell's professorship and suit filed together with related correspondence; draft statements and biographical notes about Russell; court records; and a file dedicated to the correspondence of Patricia Russell, Russell's wife, relating to the case including copies of her replies to letters on behalf of Russell. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a single letter (from Harriet M. Lovell to Russell, 1940) acquired with Archives 2.

Legal actions: First World War, Rex v. Russell, 1918

Series consists of a few documents relating to the 1918 court case for which Russell was convicted under the Defence of the Realm Act and sentenced to Brixton prison. The charge resulted from comments made by Russell in the article ‘The German Peace Offer’ which had been published in The Tribunal on January 3, 1918. Included are: a letter from Russell's solicitor sent to Russell while in Brixton Prison; a copy of a petition protesting the imprisonment of Russell; a copy of a document entitled "Use of United States Military in Industrial Disputes" which Russell intended to use in his defence, as indicated by his attached handwritten note; and other documents.

Legal actions: First World War, the Everett case, 1916

Series consists of a few documents relating to legal actions surrounding the distribution of the so-called ‘Everett leaflet’ by the No-Conscription Fellowship (NCF) in April, 1916. The leaflet, entitled ‘Two Years’ Hard Labour for Refusing to Disobey the Dictates of Conscience,’ was critical of the harsh treatment given Ernest Everett, a conscientious objector. After others were arrested for distributing the leaflet, Russell publicly acknowledged writing it, for which he was charged, convicted, and fined. Included are: NCF circulars; correspondence; a manuscript of Russell's defence speech for his trial on 5 June 1916; a pamphlet and reports of the court proceedings; Russell's bail certificate dated 10 June 1916; and typescript copies of the prosecutions and sentences of other conscientious objectors.

Letters from the general public / miscellaneous correspondence

As noted in the Archives 2 print finding aid: “This category of correspondence is formed from those letters that belong neither to series 710, Personal Correspondence, nor to the political, family or publishing series.” While “most of these letters are repetitive in content (e.g., requesting Russell's autograph) and did not elicit significant replies,” some of them touch on his philosophical writings or offer support for his anti-war or anti-nuclear activities. Replies from Russell are typescript copies. Series acquired with both Archives 1 and 2.

The series reflects the influence of Edith Russell on Russell’s filing habits. Prior to 1952, Russell filed the types of letters found here with his Personal Correspondence (series 710). Beginning in 1952, these letters started to be filed separately.

Liberal Party

This small series consists of correspondence with the Liberal Party and its branches. Includes: an invitation for Russell to submit himself as a Liberal candidate from the Home Counties Liberal Federation in 1908 and from the Oxford Liberal Association in 1910; a rejection for his candidacy from the Bedford Liberal Association in 1910; a letter requesting Russell's support for the Liberal Party in 1959 for the upcoming election, and Russell's reply in which he refuses to give his endorsement. Letters from Russell and some received letters are typescript copies.

Manuscripts authored by Russell

Consists of manuscripts and typescripts of works authored by Russell, including the following 3 series acquired with Archives 1 and 2. Since the acquisition of Archives 1 and 2, additional manuscripts have been acquired as part of Archives 3, or ‘recent acquisitions’. While not included in the physical extent for this series indicated above, these ‘recent acquisitions’ are listed in the online finding aid.

<b>210 Book manuscripts. – 1896-1968. – 4.1 m</b> (34 boxes: 3.1-3.30, 8.41-8.42, 8.52, 11.68)
Includes manuscripts and typescripts of 50 books authored by Russell, beginning with German Social Democracy (1896) and ending with volume 3 of The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell (1969). Includes complete, or near complete manuscripts, as well as smaller portions of manuscripts; also includes some letters. Items are arranged primarily in chronological order. Most of the series was acquired with Russell Archives 1, with additional items acquired with Archives 2.

<b>220 Article manuscripts. – 1878-1968. – 7.1 m</b> (59 boxes: 3.34-3.75, 9.1-9.17, 11.68)
Includes hundreds of manuscripts and typescripts of Russell’s articles, essays, speeches, letters to editors, etc., including both those that were published and those that were not (many unpublished items now appear in The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell). The items begin in his childhood and end 90 years later. Also contains some related correspondence, including typescript copies and photocopies of outgoing correspondence. Most of the series was acquired with Russell Archives 1, with additional items acquired with Archives 2.

The article manuscripts are arranged in 2 overlapping chronological sequences within Archives 1 and Archives 2. RA1, boxes 3.34 to 3.75, contain documents dated 1878-1968. RA2, boxes 9.01 to 9.11, and 11.68, contain documents dated 1893-1966, with most of them dated 1945-1966.

<b>230 Manuscripts relating to The Principles of Mathematics and Principia Mathematica. – 1895-1925. – 1.2 m</b> (9 boxes: 3.76-3.84)
Includes manuscripts and supporting documents relating to The Principles of Mathematics and Principia Mathematica (though most Principia manuscripts did not survive), as well as early work on the foundations of physics. Most of the documents are in Russell’s own hand. Also includes a few related letters. The series was acquired primarily with Archives 1.

Miscellaneous personal documents

This series consists of over 20 discrete personal items, including three passports (1919, 1931-36, 1941-46); certified copies of Russell's birth certificate and death certificate, including correspondence relating to his cremation; visa to Soviet Russia, 1920, and other travel documents; various membership cards; two vaccination records; lists of earnings and royalties; schedule of lectures in the U.S. for 1927; photographs of his children (Kate and John); sheet photographs of children at Beacon Hill School; and other material. Received with both Archives 1 and 2.

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