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World government, 1953-1965

Series consists of correspondence, circulars, meeting minutes, invitations, news clippings, statements, and booklets relating to Russell's interest in world government, and his engagement with groups such as the Parliamentary Group for World Government, Parliamentary Association for World Government, and World Association of Parliamentarians for World Government. Letters from Russell are typescript copies. Some of the material dated 1955 overlaps with series 600 Peace Activities.

World affairs

Series relates to Russell’s involvement in international affairs, especially regarding issues of peace. By 1963, the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation had been established, and the affairs of the BRPF are also reflected here. Accordingly, there is some overlap with the BRPF series (311 onward). There is also overlap with series 640 Heads of State. The files are arranged alphabetically by name of country, and also include material relating to the United Nations. The U.S.A. files are the most voluminous and include sub-sections relating to ‘The Fallout Suits’ (Linus Pauling), the assassination of John F. Kennedy, the Anti-Goldwater Campaign, and the International War Crimes Tribunal.

Included are correspondence (including letters to editors), circular letters, statements, news clippings, reports, speeches, leaflets, interviews, and newsletters; letters from Russell are typescript copies. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Works/material by others

Series consists of various drafts, proofs, manuscripts, and typescripts of works such as theses, poetry, plays, articles, reports, essays and books that were sent to Russell. There are also several newspaper clippings. Some materials are inscribed and some are accompanied by correspondence. Topics are varied, and sent materials include works pertaining to Russell's philosophical and mathematical interests, his peace activities, and the Kennedy assassination to name a few. As noted in the print finding aid for Russell Archives 2: “Authors sent their works in progress on every conceivable topic to Russell. So did publishers with their prospective books. The self-published did the same. The result is that Russell had to develop a standard response to such requests for advice: that if he read all their works, he would have no time to write his own. Sometimes correspondence is attached to the item concerned. This class does not include large number of political works listed in other classes. It does include the original typescripts of the contributions to Bertrand Russell: Philosopher of the Century, edited by Ralph Schoenman.”

Women's suffrage

Series consists of letters, circulars, press clippings, agendas, flyers, and articles relating to women's suffrage and to the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS), of which Russell was an executive member. Some of the letters include explanatory comments and annotations by Russell. Also includes articles relating to the "Wives' Savings" crisis in 1907 as well as flyers, posters, and cards from the 1907 Wimbledon by-election, which Russell contested for the NUWSS. Also includes Russell's 1909 resignation from the NUWSS executive—the original (in Alys Russell's hand) was included with Archives 2, and includes the reply from the Secretary, Marion Philips; a later typed copy of Russell's letter was included with Archives 1.

United Europe Movement

Series consists of correspondence, membership information and printed material relating to the United Europe Movement. Also includes a brief note in Russell’s hand which reads in part: “The United Europe Movement, inaugurated by Churchill in 1946, was to embrace all Europe except Russia. … I thought it would safeguard peace, and joined it. … In the end, nothing came of it except NATO, and I had no further connection with it.” Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Union of Democratic Control

Series consists primarily of letters received by Russell from various branches of the UDC requesting that he speak at their meetings. Russell was an early leader of the UDC, which was founded in part to combat what was perceived as ‘secret’ foreign policy in the lead up to the First World War. Also includes a UDC circular letter of 1914 signed by Ramsay MacDonald, Charles Trevelyan, Norman Angell, and E.D. Morel, pamphlets, draft writings, and other material. The items from 1963 relate to an early UDC pamphlet written by Russell, ‘War: the Offspring of Fear’. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

The Pauling row

Series relates to Russell's vigorous support for Linus Pauling, who had been criticized (along with Edward Teller) in an article by Bentley Glass for offering political opinions. The article, 'Scientists in Politics', had been published in the May 1962 issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. Series consists of correspondence with Pauling, Joseph Rotblat, Eugene Rabinowitch (the founder of the Bulletin), and Bentley Glass. Also included is the May 1962 issue of the Bulletin. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

See also the file "Directors and Advisers" in series 350, BRPF Branch Offices, for a small collection of correspondence with Pauling as well as statements and offprints that he authored. His letters reveal his opinions regarding the membership of certain American scientists in the Pugwash Conference following the publication of Glass' article.

The New Commonwealth

Series consists of correspondence, reports, proposals, a questionnaire, a news clipping, pamphlets, statements, essays, and articles relating to the activities of the New Commonwealth society, which had been founded in 1932 and had interests in world government and the control of atomic weapons; they also produced the New Commonwealth Quarterly which featured articles by Russell. Russell undertook a lecture tour on the continent on the society's behalf in 1947. Series was acquired as part of Archives 1.

The Family Planning Association and related correspondence

Series consists of correspondence, news clippings, statements, copies of various journals, printed essays, pamphlets, bulletins, and articles illustrating Russell's interest in and support of birth control. Among the more voluminous publications are issues of the bulletin News of Population and Birth Control from 1956-1965 and of the journal Family Planning from Dec. 1952 until Dec. 1963, which are filed at the end of the series. Letters from Russell are typescript copies; includes some drafts. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Stanley relatives

Series consists of Bertrand Russell's correspondence with his Stanley relatives ranging from his early life to later years and offers insight into significant events in Russell's life and the nature of his relationships with certain family members. Russell's family members often include their opinions about his writings and activities in the correspondence. Some replies are written by Lady Edith Russell. Letters from Russell are typescript copies, and several incoming letters are typescript copies although most are handwritten or typed originals.

Correspondents include Lady Alice Avebury, Andrew Cunningham, Lady Agnes Grove, Lady Dorothy Henley, Aurea Howard, Geoffry Howard, Nancy Mitford, Elspeth Fox Pitt, G.L. Fox Pitt, Cecilia Roberts, uncle Lyulph Stanley, aunt Maude Stanley, and Fabia Stanley.

Of note are letters from Russell's uncle, Lyulph Stanley, who supported Russell during WWI; some correspondence with Nancy Mitford relating to her book Voltaire in Love; correspondence with Lady Dorothy Henley relating to her book about her mother titled Rosalind Howard, Countess Carlisle; and correspondence with his cousin Elspeth Fox Pitt during Russell's second time in prison in 1961.

Acquired primarily as part of Archives 1, with some additional items acquired as part of Archives 2.

Sound recordings

Series consists of:

(1) 49 reel to reel recordings, 1939-1963, acquired with Archives 1; most have been converted to cassettes; includes: interviews on various radio programs; Russell speeches at mass meetings of the Committee of 100 at Trafalgar square and other gatherings; Russell’s 90 birthday concert; and more.

(2) 28 reel to reel recordings, 1963-1968, acquired with Archives 2; all have been converted to cassettes; most of the recordings deal with the International War Crimes Tribunal, while others include radio interviews and other topics.

(3) ca. 170 recordings (reel to reel, cassette, vinyl, and CDs), 1938-1996, acquired as ‘Recent Acquisitions’, or Archives 3; includes: numerous interviews with and speeches by Russell, but also many interviews with various people about Russell, and other material.

Russell's dictation

Series consists of drafts of correspondence and of articles dictated by Russell to his wife, Edith, and handwritten by her. Most of the letters in this series are also related to correspondence in other series. Some replies are brief, such as those pertaining to meetings or those which merely acknowledge the receipt of letters. Also includes replies pertaining to Russell's peace activities, editorial letters, and letters relating to his opinions on morals, religion, family life, etc. Acquired as part of Archives 1 and 2. As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, "It is ... a very useful source of information, not least for being arranged chronologically."

Russell relatives

Series consists of Bertrand Russell's correspondence with his Russell relatives ranging from his early life to later years and offers insight into significant events in Russell's life and the nature of his relationships with certain family members. Letters from family members often include opinions about Russell's writings and activities. Letters from Russell are typescript copies, and some incoming letters are typescript copies although most are handwritten or typed originals.

Some letters, such as those sent from his grandmother, Lady Frances Russell, and aunt, Lady Agatha Russell, refer to his decision not to enter into a political career. Lady Agatha also expresses disappointment regarding rumours of his extramarital affairs in the 1920s, and Aunt Georgiana Peel and her daughter Ethel disagree with his anti-war convictions during WWI.

Correspondence with his cousin Flora Russell from 1941-1967 depicts a close relationship that existed in Russell's later life; the correspondence includes friendly joking and invitations to visit. Russell also received letters from various distant cousins who wished to reconnect or to initiate communication.

Correspondents include his grandmother Lady Frances Russell (box 6.30), his uncles George Gilbert William Russell (box 6.30) and Rollo Russell (box 6.30, 11.08), his aunts Lady Agatha Russell (box 6.29), Lady Georgiana Peel (box 6.29), and Lady Charlotte Portal (box 6.29), and cousins.

Russell's cousins include:

Elizabeth Cobb (box 6.29)
Arthur D. Elliot (box 6.29)
Hugh Elliot (box 6.29)
Margaret Elliot (box 6.29)
Rachel Elliot (box 6.29)
Grace Forester (box 6.29, 11.08)
Margaret and John Lloyd (box 6.29, 11.08)
Leonora Russell de Mello (box 6.30)
Alicia [Russell] (6.30)
Anthony Russell (box 6.30)
Claud Russell (box 6.30)
Cosmo Russell (box 6.30)
Diana Russell (box 6.30)
Flora Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
George W.E. Russell (box 6.30)
Sir Guy Russell (box 6.30)
Harold Russell (box 6.30)
John W. Russell (box 6.30)
Martin Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Maud Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Raymond Russell (box 6.30)
Rupert Strong (box 6.30, 11.08)
Gwendoline Villiers (box 6.30)
Rollo Villiers (box 6.30)

Acquired primarily with Archives 1 with some additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Radio and television requests

Series consists of correspondence and other documents regarding Russell's radio broadcasts and television appearances, primarily with the BBC, but also including US networks ABC, CBS and NBC; Canada’s CBC; Australia’s ABC; Polskie Radio, Radio Free Europe, and many others. The BBC material includes a file on “The Life and Times of Bertrand Russell”, a 92nd birthday tribute; it contains a script, shot lists, and other documents relating to the May, 1964 broadcast, featuring Robert Bolt (interviewer), A.J. Ayer, Robert Boothby, Michael Foot, Julian Huxley, Miles Malleson and Leonard Woof. Also included are letters regarding a 1959 broadcast relating to Wisdom of the West, and correspondence with journalists such as Alistair Cooke, Kenneth Harris and Woodrow Wyatt. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a few additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Pugwash movement

Series consists of correspondence, 1956-1966, the published proceedings of the 2nd-13th Pugwash Conferences, reports of various Conferences, agendas and minutes of the 1st-3rd and 10th Conferences, as well as minutes of some Pugwash Continuing Committee meetings. Other printed materials include news clippings, booklets, offprints, statements, and two published histories of the Pugwash movement, including ‘The Pugwash Movement: Its History and Aim’, London, 1960 (in box 1.39). Of particular note is the correspondence between Russell and Cyrus Eaton, the primary financier of the Pugwash Conferences; correspondence with Conference co-founder Joseph Rotblat; and letters written by Lady Edith Russell and Anne Eaton. Letters from Russell are typescript copies. The Pugwash Conferences were an outgrowth of the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, bringing international scientists together to reflect on the social consequences of their work; the first Conference took place in 1957; Russell was not in attendance. Most of this series was acquired as part of Archives 1, with additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Publishing correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's publishers as well as requests for Russell to contribute writings for various journals, pamphlets, etc. Also includes some book covers from Allen & Unwin for some of Russell's published works. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; some received letters are photocopies.

Acquired as part of Archives 1 and Archives 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states that the series "represent the general correspondence of Russell and his staff with publishers of every description. Includes some Vietnam publishing correspondence. There are several files with George Allen & Unwin Ltd., Russell's English publisher since 1916, including one stray letter from 1919. The general correspondence contains much information about translations of Russell's works - e.g., a Russian translation of "Satan in the Suburbs" in Zvezda, 1963."

Publishers' contracts

Series consists of approximately 90 publishers contracts of which most are from the publishers listed in series 410, and several letters relating to the contracts. Also includes other financial documents, such as a list of Russell's earnings in 1950.

Press abuse

Series consists of correspondence with newspapers with which Russell had complaints for statements made about him. Russell's letters include requests for apologies and statements to be published in newspapers. Some letters are written by Ralph Schoenman or Chris Farley. Outgoing correspondence consists of typescript copies. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Pocket diaries

Series consists of Russell’s appointment diaries, which contain a variety of information. Note that the diaries for 1906-1907 went missing before the archives came to McMaster; the diary for the year 1968/69 was not used, so the latest content is for 1967/68.

The diaries were acquired with both Archives 1 and Archives 2 but are now arranged together in one sequence. The RA2 print finding aid notes: “includes Russell’s Cambridge Pocket Diaries from 1953 to 1970. These diaries record not only his appointments but also his income as an author.”

Photographs

Series consists of photographs owned by Russell and his family, as well as items acquired from other sources. While Russell is the subject of most of the photographs, others depict family members, friends, other individuals, and various events and locations. Includes material acquired with Russell Archives 1 and 2, as well as more recent acquisitions (Russell Archives 3).

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