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IWCT: Correspondence with Newspapers

Series forms part of Archives 2 and consists of several hundred letters to editors as well as news clippings, articles, and statements relating to the Vietnam War. The letters to editors range in tone and length. Some letters, such as those with The New York Times, contain disagreements and rebuttals regarding Russell's views about American military conduct in Vietnam; other letters contain expositions of American conduct in Vietnam or summaries of the International War Crime Tribunal's sessions to those newspapers or periodicals which had not yet published any coverage of the sessions. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

At the end of the series, there are various articles relating to the IWCT sessions as well as published and unpublished articles regarding the objectives and work of the IWCT. As noted in the RA2 print finding aid, “Ralph Schoenman's name appears as the author of several of them.” There is also material by Conrad Russell. Also includes the verdicts and results of the IWCT's first session in Stockholm from 2-10 May 1967 and of the IWCT's second session in Copenhagen from 20-30 November 1967.

Among those newspapers corresponded with are:

The Times
Washington Post
The New York Times
Reporter Magazine
The Observer
Toronto Star Weekly
New York Herald Tribune
I.F. Stone's Weekly
Peace News
The Guardian
Sunday Times
Toronto Star
Bristol Evening Post
Dagens Nyheter
Daily Telegraph
New Statesmen
Newsweek
San Francisco Sunday Examiner and Chronicle
Delo
Detroit News
Tribune
Le Monde
Spokesman-Review
National Guardian
Combat
Manila Times
The Economist
New Leader
New Society
Morning Star
Ramparts
Der Spiegel
The Melbourne Age
The Star-Bulletin

"Later" Legal and Business Correspondence

Series consists largely of legal correspondence relating to alleged press abuse that Russell experienced in newspapers such as The Economist and Daily Mirror, and other publications; also includes documentation on various lawsuits. As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “Russell felt obliged to check journalistic scurrility when it blackened his name. The Penthouse file contains, in addition to the first issue of the British edition (March 1965), two copies of a pre-publication brochure falsely listing Russell among the future contributors.”

This series also includes business correspondence and financial statements relating to the purchase, sublet, and rental of properties as well as dividends, account summaries, etc. Much of the correspondence is between B.M. Birnberg & Co. and Russell, Ralph Schoenman, or Chris Farley. Includes typescript copies of Russell's outgoing correspondence as well as some typescript copies of incoming correspondence.

BRPF: Branch offices

Series consists largely of correspondence with BRPF's international branches and also contains specific files pertaining to conference preparation, drafts of bulletins, and correspondence with branch directors and advisers. Includes typescript copies of Russell's and his staff's outgoing correspondence.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “There are ... files dealing specifically with conferences sponsored, the Foundation’s directors and advisers, its executive officers (Christopher Farley and Ralph Schoenman), and efforts to win the Nobel Peace Prize for Russell. In one file (London School of Economics meeting, 1965) there is a reading text in Edith Russell’s hand of Russell’s speech entitled “The Labour Party’s Foreign Policy”. In another there is the Foundation Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 1 (February 1960), with various pre-publication versions. The contents of the files are listed [in the print finding aid] on the basis of the first appearance of a given correspondent in a given file."

BRPF: British Council for Peace in Vietnam

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The BCPV campaigned more for a negotiated settlement in the Vietnam War than for outright victory on behalf of the National Liberation Front. A chief correspondent for the BCPV was Fenner, Lord Brockway, who, with Russell, had opposed the First World War. He and Russell had some sharp disagreements over policy.” The finding aid also lists the names Amicia M. Young, Dick Nettleton, and Barbara Haq.

Includes circulars inviting involvement in the council, event adverts, a bulletin, and correspondence between Russell and other BRPF members regarding the possible collaboration of the BRPF and the BCPV. The correspondence also contains disagreements on topics such as the International War Crimes Tribunal and policy for opposition of the Vietnam War. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

97th Birthday

Series consists of approximately 50 birthday letters addressed to Russell for his 97th birthday from individuals and organizations around the world who were both known and unknown to him. Many were sent by admirers of Russell. Russell died at age 97, and thus the items in this series mark his last birthday.

Russell relatives

Series consists of Bertrand Russell's correspondence with his Russell relatives ranging from his early life to later years and offers insight into significant events in Russell's life and the nature of his relationships with certain family members. Letters from family members often include opinions about Russell's writings and activities. Letters from Russell are typescript copies, and some incoming letters are typescript copies although most are handwritten or typed originals.

Some letters, such as those sent from his grandmother, Lady Frances Russell, and aunt, Lady Agatha Russell, refer to his decision not to enter into a political career. Lady Agatha also expresses disappointment regarding rumours of his extramarital affairs in the 1920s, and Aunt Georgiana Peel and her daughter Ethel disagree with his anti-war convictions during WWI.

Correspondence with his cousin Flora Russell from 1941-1967 depicts a close relationship that existed in Russell's later life; the correspondence includes friendly joking and invitations to visit. Russell also received letters from various distant cousins who wished to reconnect or to initiate communication.

Correspondents include his grandmother Lady Frances Russell (box 6.30), his uncles George Gilbert William Russell (box 6.30) and Rollo Russell (box 6.30, 11.08), his aunts Lady Agatha Russell (box 6.29), Lady Georgiana Peel (box 6.29), and Lady Charlotte Portal (box 6.29), and cousins.

Russell's cousins include:

Elizabeth Cobb (box 6.29)
Arthur D. Elliot (box 6.29)
Hugh Elliot (box 6.29)
Margaret Elliot (box 6.29)
Rachel Elliot (box 6.29)
Grace Forester (box 6.29, 11.08)
Margaret and John Lloyd (box 6.29, 11.08)
Leonora Russell de Mello (box 6.30)
Alicia [Russell] (6.30)
Anthony Russell (box 6.30)
Claud Russell (box 6.30)
Cosmo Russell (box 6.30)
Diana Russell (box 6.30)
Flora Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
George W.E. Russell (box 6.30)
Sir Guy Russell (box 6.30)
Harold Russell (box 6.30)
John W. Russell (box 6.30)
Martin Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Maud Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Raymond Russell (box 6.30)
Rupert Strong (box 6.30, 11.08)
Gwendoline Villiers (box 6.30)
Rollo Villiers (box 6.30)

Acquired primarily with Archives 1 with some additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Birthday cards, 1950-1969

Series consists of approximately 500 cards congratulating Russell on his birthdays over the years 1950-1969. Includes cards from family members, friends, and other individuals and organizational bodies. Most were acquired with Archives 1, while a few cards dated 1961 were acquired with Archives 2.

Letters from the general public / miscellaneous correspondence

As noted in the Archives 2 print finding aid: “This category of correspondence is formed from those letters that belong neither to series 710, Personal Correspondence, nor to the political, family or publishing series.” While “most of these letters are repetitive in content (e.g., requesting Russell's autograph) and did not elicit significant replies,” some of them touch on his philosophical writings or offer support for his anti-war or anti-nuclear activities. Replies from Russell are typescript copies. Series acquired with both Archives 1 and 2.

The series reflects the influence of Edith Russell on Russell’s filing habits. Prior to 1952, Russell filed the types of letters found here with his Personal Correspondence (series 710). Beginning in 1952, these letters started to be filed separately.

Condolences on Russell's death: answered by Lady Russell

As noted in the Archives 2 print finding aid, "Edith Russell received many condolences" following Bertrand Russell's death on 2 February 1970 and "she personally replied to" those included in this series (though copies of her replies are not here). Of note are letters from Dora Russell and John Conrad Russell offering condolences and revealing that they had intended to visit Russell just before his death.

Frank Russell - death: condolences, etc.

Series consists of: condolences sent to Bertrand Russell after Frank Russell's death in Marseilles on 3 March 1931 along with typescript copies of his replies; correspondence between Bertrand Russell and Frank's friend, Miss Otter, concerning the ceremony of scattering Frank's ashes, her being Frank's beneficiary, and the valuation of Frank's possessions. Also includes a 1970 screenplay, "Tried by Their Peers, 2. The Trial of Lord Russell (who died in 1931) for Bigamy--1901)", by Donald Thomas; and correspondence between Chris Farley and Barry Feinberg in 1970 regarding Bertrand Russell's 1931 statement about Frank Russell's death.

BRPF: General political correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with individuals known and unknown to Russell as well as with various campaigns with aims similar to those of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation. Correspondents include Cyrus Eaton, an American businessman and philanthropist who was a sponsor of the Pugwash Conferences, as well as organizations such as the Committee on Science and Freedom, the British Peace Committee, the British "Who Killed Kennedy?" Committee, etc. Also accompanying some letters are printed materials, such as news clippings, flyers, circular letters, off prints, newsletters, etc. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The chief criteria used in forming this [series] were the independence of the correspondents from governmental bodies, and their independence from the specific campaign organizations with which Russell was involved. Russell’s messages to demonstrations are often included in the contents."

Publishing correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's publishers as well as requests for Russell to contribute writings for various journals, pamphlets, etc. Also includes some book covers from Allen & Unwin for some of Russell's published works. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; some received letters are photocopies.

Acquired as part of Archives 1 and Archives 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states that the series "represent the general correspondence of Russell and his staff with publishers of every description. Includes some Vietnam publishing correspondence. There are several files with George Allen & Unwin Ltd., Russell's English publisher since 1916, including one stray letter from 1919. The general correspondence contains much information about translations of Russell's works - e.g., a Russian translation of "Satan in the Suburbs" in Zvezda, 1963."

Condolences on Russell's death: general

Series consists of condolences on Russell's death addressed to the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, members of Russell's staff, or his wife Edith Russell. The condolences are from various individuals and organizations who knew Russell personally or were influenced by his life's work. Includes some typed copies of replies from Ken Coates and Christopher Farley, often on behalf of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation or his wife Edith Russell.

Financial correspondence and related records

Four small series have been grouped together here: <b>751:</b> Russell’s correspondence with his accountant, Percy A. Popkin. <b>752:</b> Additional correspondence with various financial institutions, including Barclay’s Bank and Child & Col. Also includes three bank account “pass” books, one for Beacon Hill School from 1927-1931 and two for personal use from 1923-1929, 1929-1934. <b>753:</b> 14 bank deposit books (1950, 1952-60, 1962, 1968) and 176 cheque book stubs (1935-37, 1947-56, 1958-69). As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, the deposit books “record individual deposits, with the date, beneficiary and amount, but seldom with any note on the source,” while the cheque-book stubs “provide date, payee and amount. Sometimes they are filled out in other hands.” <b>754:</b> miscellaneous correspondence.

While much of the material relates to payments of various kinds, some of those payments relate to maintenance payments to his former wives, and matters relating to his children and grandchildren.

Photocopies, mimeographs, and other documents

<b>972 Odds and Ends (boxes 11.59-11.60)</b>: ephemera and other personal documents, such as pamphlets, leaflets, advertisements, programmes, posters, invitations, circulars, publishers' catalogues, and business cards, as well as news clippings, newsletters, articles (including offprints and photocopies), statements, correspondence, film negatives (including those from an IWCT trip to Vietnam), two maps, a painting of Russell, a dog licence, and blank postcards. Includes photocopies of some of Russell's notable correspondence and articles. There are materials related to a variety of Russell's academic, social, and political interests and activities such as nuclear disarmament, the Kennedy assassination, philosophy, marriage and divorce, BRPF, IWCT, and NCD to name a few.

<b>973 Archival lists (box 11.61)</b>: one draft copy and one proof copy of Barry Feinberg, ed., A Detailed Catalogue of the Archives of Bertrand Russell (London: Continuum 1 Ltd., 1967) for Russell Archives 1, notes relating to K. Blackwell and C. Spadoni, The Second Archives of Bertrand Russell (Bristol: Thoemmes, 1992) for Russell Archives 2, and Edith's notes pertaining to the shipment of Russell's papers for Russell Archives 1.

<b>974 Photocopies (box 11.62)</b>: photocopies of correspondence from series 650 (Heads of State); from series 210 (Book Manuscripts); of correspondence used in Russell’s Autobiography; and annotated photocopies of Barry Feinberg, ed., A Detailed Catalogue of the Archives of Bertrand Russell (London: Continuum 1 Ltd., 1967).

<b>975 Mimeographed Statements (boxes 11.63-11.67)</b>: Series consists of mimeographed copies of Russell's statements, articles, speeches, and correspondence as well as some speeches and articles written by Ralph Schoenman relating to topics such as the treatment of Jews in the Soviet Union, the Vietnam War, and the Cold War. Also includes copies of two issues of the Vietnam Solidarity Bulletin from 1966 and copies of mimeographed statements published in the bulletin.

BRPF: World affairs

Series consists largely of correspondence with heads of state and governmental bodies about Russell's global concerns such as political prisoners and treatment of Soviet Jews, the Goldwater US presidential campaign, the Gaza Strip, the Vietnam War, etc. Among the correspondents are: Nikita Krushchev, Chou En-lai (Zhou Enlai), and U Thant. Also includes various printed materials such as press statements, news clippings, etc. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies. The series was acquired as a part of Archives 2.

BRPF: Political prisoners

Series consists of correspondence with heads of state and foreign governments, with individuals concerned about certain political prisoners, and letters to editors. The correspondence reveals Russell's staunch advocacy for political prisoners across the world. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] reflects the concern of Russell and the Peace Foundation to free political prisoners, whatever their nationality. Of necessity many of the negotiations with foreign governments had to be conducted with the strictest secrecy. The frequent successes could not be publicized, but the background to each can be ascertained in these files. The files are catalogued [in the print finding aid] on the basis of the first appearance of a given correspondent in a given file. It is only in these files that we learn of Russell’s connections with certain organizations—e.g., his honorary presidency of the Spanish Workers Defence Committee. Public statements and messages are also to be found here."

BRPF: Miscellaneous politics

Series consists of correspondence relating to a variety of global events, affairs, and campaigns. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] contains a variety of specific files that do not fit well into any other political classification. The files [range] from the Cuban Missile Crisis to correspondence in the India file from 1970. Some files concern specific campaigns such as the South East Asia Appeal or the Committee of 100. The first file reveals an unsuccessful attempt at fund-raising through the offer of the use of Bertrand and Edith Russell’s names on commercial products."

IWCT: Working correspondence with Vietnamese

Series consists of correspondence relating to the presence of American troops in Southern Vietnam, alleged American war crimes in Vietnam, and the fight for Vietnam's independence. Notable is correspondence with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam's president, Ho Chi Minh, regarding the International War Crimes Tribunal. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies and photocopies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The earliest item from Ho Chi Minh is dated 10 August 1964. The thick files indicate the symbolic importance of Russell's solidarity with the Vietnamese struggle for independence."

IWCT: Members' correspondence on Czechoslovakia

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “In September 1968 Russell organized a declaration regarding the worsening situation in Czechoslovakia. He later organized a conference on the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia, involving several of the Tribunal members.”

Includes correspondence relating to the International War Crimes Tribunal's activities in response to the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968. Also includes signed declarations by IWCT members. Letters from Russell are typescript copies.

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