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Frank Russell v. Mabel Edith (1st wife) - matrimonial suit

Series consists of papers and correspondence relating to the 1891 matrimonial suit initiated by Frank Russell’s first wife, Mabel Edith Scott, on a charge of cruelty; in addition, there was a charge of a 'gross nature' concerning 'a man called X'. The trial lasted four days and resulted in Russell’s acquittal. Russell's solicitor was A.P. Doulton, of the firm Vandercom, Hardy, Oatway and Doulton, who handled much of Russell's correspondence at this time. Also includes two written testimonies for the court proceedings attesting to Frank Russell's character (filed at the end of the series), as well as Mabel Edith's own incoming correspondence (some photocopies) during 1890-1891 covering topics such as her dissatisfaction with her marriage and her desire to separate from and/or divorce Frank Russell. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Women's suffrage

Series consists of letters, circulars, press clippings, agendas, flyers, and articles relating to women's suffrage and to the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (NUWSS), of which Russell was an executive member. Some of the letters include explanatory comments and annotations by Russell. Also includes articles relating to the "Wives' Savings" crisis in 1907 as well as flyers, posters, and cards from the 1907 Wimbledon by-election, which Russell contested for the NUWSS. Also includes Russell's 1909 resignation from the NUWSS executive—the original (in Alys Russell's hand) was included with Archives 2, and includes the reply from the Secretary, Marion Philips; a later typed copy of Russell's letter was included with Archives 1.

Frank Russell personal items

Series consists of three journals (Jan-Oct 1880, July 1883-Feb 1884, and Feb-Aug 1884 and Jan-Feb 1890) belonging to Frank Russell; handwritten musical score with a song 'Little Frank Russell' (by his grandmother?); three poems in Frank Russell's handwriting, dated July 1883, Oct 1884 and Dec 1884; handwritten poems headed 'Granny to Frank, 1867’ and another in the same hand dated 1897; a poem in unidentified hand dated 1884; letter from Home Office (27 July 1911) enclosing copy of the Free Pardon granted in respect of Frank Russell's bigamy conviction; and manuscript and typescript copy of song lyrics presumably by Frank, headed ‘With Apologies to Messrs Moody & Sankey’. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Legal actions: First World War, the Everett case, 1916

Series consists of a few documents relating to legal actions surrounding the distribution of the so-called ‘Everett leaflet’ by the No-Conscription Fellowship (NCF) in April, 1916. The leaflet, entitled ‘Two Years’ Hard Labour for Refusing to Disobey the Dictates of Conscience,’ was critical of the harsh treatment given Ernest Everett, a conscientious objector. After others were arrested for distributing the leaflet, Russell publicly acknowledged writing it, for which he was charged, convicted, and fined. Included are: NCF circulars; correspondence; a manuscript of Russell's defence speech for his trial on 5 June 1916; a pamphlet and reports of the court proceedings; Russell's bail certificate dated 10 June 1916; and typescript copies of the prosecutions and sentences of other conscientious objectors.

Legal actions: First World War, Rex v. Russell, 1918

Series consists of a few documents relating to the 1918 court case for which Russell was convicted under the Defence of the Realm Act and sentenced to Brixton prison. The charge resulted from comments made by Russell in the article ‘The German Peace Offer’ which had been published in The Tribunal on January 3, 1918. Included are: a letter from Russell's solicitor sent to Russell while in Brixton Prison; a copy of a petition protesting the imprisonment of Russell; a copy of a document entitled "Use of United States Military in Industrial Disputes" which Russell intended to use in his defence, as indicated by his attached handwritten note; and other documents.

No-Conscription Fellowship

Series consists of correspondence among members of the No-Conscription Fellowship, of which Russell was a leading member; the group opposed conscription in Britain during the First World War. Also includes circulars, forms, proposals, reports, and flyers. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell correspondence with Bertrand Russell

Series consists of correspondence between Russell and his elder brother, John Francis Stanley (Frank) Russell (1865-1931), spanning from Bertrand Russell's early life until two years before Frank Russell's death. The elder Russell became the 2nd Earl Russell while still a schoolboy in 1878, on the death of his grandfather, Lord John. He was married three times, to Mabel Edith Scott (m. 1890), Mollie Somerville (m. 1900), and author Elizabeth von Arnim (m. 1916).

Some letters in this series were written while Bertrand Russell was in Brixton Prison (May-Aug 1918) and while he was in China and Japan (Sep 1920-Aug 1921). Bertrand Russell's letters which were sent from prison (handwritten originals and typescript copies) contain messages for other individuals such as Lady Ottoline, Whitehead, and Elizabeth Russell, Frank's wife. Also includes correspondence relating to Frank Russell's divorce from Mabel Edith and the resulting felony charge for bigamy and the court case in 1901. The original handwritten letters are often accompanied with a typescript copy. Most of this series was acquired with Archives 1, with 3 items acquired with Archives 2.

Frank Russell - politics and the law

Series consists of letters relating to Frank Russell's careers in politics and the legal profession. Many are from members of the House of Lords, where Russell first took his seat in 1887. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell - letters from friends and family

Series consists of Frank Russell's correspondence with family and friends. Incoming correspondence largely consists of handwritten originals; outgoing correspondence consists of typescript copies. Includes copies of approximately 70 letters from Frank to George Santayana, 1887-1898, and 24 letters to Frank from the artist and playwright Laurence Housman, 1898-1925. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

1935 divorce documents - divorce from Dora Russell

Series consists of various legal documents used in the divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora Russell including two Heads of Agreements; affidavits and petitions by Russell and Dora Russell; affidavits from approximately fifteen individuals about Beacon Hill School; statements; draft of Russell's will and a deed poll; deed of gift; earnings record; memorandum; some correspondence and investigative reports; and, as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “’An Inventory of the Furniture and Household Effects at 'Telegraph House', Harting, Petersfield’. This document is interesting for its listing of the books in Telegraph House, among other things.”

Patricia Spence correspondence (letters received)

Series consists of mostly letters received by Patricia (Peter) Spence from a variety of correspondents, including Russell’s daughter, Kate (Katharine Tait); Spence’s mother, “Mrs. Spence”; Gamel Brenan, Gerald Brenan, Alice Crunden, Moya Llewelyn Davies, Joan Malleson, Miles Malleson, Ottoline Morell, Edna Pearce; and many others. As noted in the RA2 finding aid: “Some letters are addressed to Russell and a few others to both.” Received as part of Archives 2.

Patricia would become Russell’s third wife in 1936. She had served as governess to Russell’s children, Kate and John. Russell separated from the children’s mother, Dora Black, in 1932; they were divorced in 1936.

Ancestral papers

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s parents, Lord and Lady Amberley (John Russell and Kate Stanley), and their parents. The material is primarily correspondence but also includes journals, photographs, scrapbooks, newsclippings and other items.

The series is further arranged as follows:

<b>Lord Amberley’s (John Russell's) parents</b>
111 Lord John Russell, 1st Earl
112 Lady Frances Anna Maria Russell

<b>Lady Amberley's (Kate Stanley’s) parents</b>
121 Lord Edward John Stanley of Alderley
122 Lady Henrietta Maria Stanley

<b>The Amberleys</b>
131 Lord Amberley (John Russell)
132 Lady Amberley (Kate Stanley)
133 Frank Russell (eldest son)
134 Correspondence with friends
135 Political correspondence
136 American correspondence
137 Amberley deaths
141 Journals

<b>Photographs, Clippings, and printed material</b>

Legal actions: City College of New York

Series contains material relating to the aftermath of the February 1940 announcement that Russell had been appointed to a professorship at the City College of New York. Many on the American right rallied to oppose the appointment, and a civil suit was launched against the College. Ultimately, the appointment never occurred. Included are: correspondence with the College and other academics and members of the legal profession; letters of support or abuse from the public; news clippings about Russell's professorship and suit filed together with related correspondence; draft statements and biographical notes about Russell; court records; and a file dedicated to the correspondence of Patricia Russell, Russell's wife, relating to the case including copies of her replies to letters on behalf of Russell. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a single letter (from Harriet M. Lovell to Russell, 1940) acquired with Archives 2.

Legal actions: Barnes Case (1940-1945)

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s legal case against Dr. Alfred Barnes and the Barnes Foundation for dismissing him from his position as a lecturer at the Foundation. Dr. Barnes had recruited Russell to begin lecturing in January 1941 but ended up dismissing him in December 1942. Russell won his breach of contract suit and was awarded $20,000 in unpaid salary. Included in the series are: Russell's correspondence with Dr. Barnes and his Foundation, which gives insight into the state of their professional relationship; correspondence with Russell's lawyers; news clippings and legal documents. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

'Save Europe Now'

Series consists primarily of letters from Victor Gollancz, chairman of Save Europe Now, which was concerned with post-WWII relief and reconstruction in central Europe; some of the letters are addressed to Lady [Patricia] Russell. Also includes other correspondence, circulars, printed materials, resolutions of meetings, draft statements, copies of open letters to the Prime Minister and Minister of Food, various reports on the treatment of displaced persons in Eastern Europe as well as conditions in Europe generally and in the four zones of Germany, and other items. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

The New Commonwealth

Series consists of correspondence, reports, proposals, a questionnaire, a news clipping, pamphlets, statements, essays, and articles relating to the activities of the New Commonwealth society, which had been founded in 1932 and had interests in world government and the control of atomic weapons; they also produced the New Commonwealth Quarterly which featured articles by Russell. Russell undertook a lecture tour on the continent on the society's behalf in 1947. Series was acquired as part of Archives 1.

United Europe Movement

Series consists of correspondence, membership information and printed material relating to the United Europe Movement. Also includes a brief note in Russell’s hand which reads in part: “The United Europe Movement, inaugurated by Churchill in 1946, was to embrace all Europe except Russia. … I thought it would safeguard peace, and joined it. … In the end, nothing came of it except NATO, and I had no further connection with it.” Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Peace activities

Series consists of correspondence and printed material relating to Russell's anti-nuclear warfare activities during 1953-1955, including the broadcast of "Man's Peril", 23 Dec 1954, the development of the Russell-Einstein Manifesto (including correspondence with Einstein), and other matters. Letters from Russell are typescript copies. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Liberal Party

This small series consists of correspondence with the Liberal Party and its branches. Includes: an invitation for Russell to submit himself as a Liberal candidate from the Home Counties Liberal Federation in 1908 and from the Oxford Liberal Association in 1910; a rejection for his candidacy from the Bedford Liberal Association in 1910; a letter requesting Russell's support for the Liberal Party in 1959 for the upcoming election, and Russell's reply in which he refuses to give his endorsement. Letters from Russell and some received letters are typescript copies.

Congress for Cultural Freedom

Series largely consists of Russell's correspondence with the Congress for Cultural Freedom and the Committee on Science and Freedom as well as reports relating to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, meeting minutes, news clippings, and bulletins. Letters from Russell are typescript copies. The Congress was concerned with the defense of intellectual freedom, particularly in eastern Europe. Russell was an honorary president but severed ties in 1956 because of the anti-communist position of the Congress' American branch. Series acquired as part of Archives 1.

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