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Ancestral papers

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s parents, Lord and Lady Amberley (John Russell and Kate Stanley), and their parents. The material is primarily correspondence but also includes journals, photographs, scrapbooks, newsclippings and other items.

The series is further arranged as follows:

<b>Lord Amberley’s (John Russell's) parents</b>
111 Lord John Russell, 1st Earl
112 Lady Frances Anna Maria Russell

<b>Lady Amberley's (Kate Stanley’s) parents</b>
121 Lord Edward John Stanley of Alderley
122 Lady Henrietta Maria Stanley

<b>The Amberleys</b>
131 Lord Amberley (John Russell)
132 Lady Amberley (Kate Stanley)
133 Frank Russell (eldest son)
134 Correspondence with friends
135 Political correspondence
136 American correspondence
137 Amberley deaths
141 Journals

<b>Photographs, Clippings, and printed material</b>

Manuscripts authored by Russell

Consists of manuscripts and typescripts of works authored by Russell, including the following 3 series acquired with Archives 1 and 2. Since the acquisition of Archives 1 and 2, additional manuscripts have been acquired as part of Archives 3, or ‘recent acquisitions’. While not included in the physical extent for this series indicated above, these ‘recent acquisitions’ are listed in the online finding aid.

<b>210 Book manuscripts. – 1896-1968. – 4.1 m</b> (34 boxes: 3.1-3.30, 8.41-8.42, 8.52, 11.68)
Includes manuscripts and typescripts of 50 books authored by Russell, beginning with German Social Democracy (1896) and ending with volume 3 of The Autobiography of Bertrand Russell (1969). Includes complete, or near complete manuscripts, as well as smaller portions of manuscripts; also includes some letters. Items are arranged primarily in chronological order. Most of the series was acquired with Russell Archives 1, with additional items acquired with Archives 2.

<b>220 Article manuscripts. – 1878-1968. – 7.1 m</b> (59 boxes: 3.34-3.75, 9.1-9.17, 11.68)
Includes hundreds of manuscripts and typescripts of Russell’s articles, essays, speeches, letters to editors, etc., including both those that were published and those that were not (many unpublished items now appear in The Collected Papers of Bertrand Russell). The items begin in his childhood and end 90 years later. Also contains some related correspondence, including typescript copies and photocopies of outgoing correspondence. Most of the series was acquired with Russell Archives 1, with additional items acquired with Archives 2.

The article manuscripts are arranged in 2 overlapping chronological sequences within Archives 1 and Archives 2. RA1, boxes 3.34 to 3.75, contain documents dated 1878-1968. RA2, boxes 9.01 to 9.11, and 11.68, contain documents dated 1893-1966, with most of them dated 1945-1966.

<b>230 Manuscripts relating to The Principles of Mathematics and Principia Mathematica. – 1895-1925. – 1.2 m</b> (9 boxes: 3.76-3.84)
Includes manuscripts and supporting documents relating to The Principles of Mathematics and Principia Mathematica (though most Principia manuscripts did not survive), as well as early work on the foundations of physics. Most of the documents are in Russell’s own hand. Also includes a few related letters. The series was acquired primarily with Archives 1.

Pocket diaries

Series consists of Russell’s appointment diaries, which contain a variety of information. Note that the diaries for 1906-1907 went missing before the archives came to McMaster; the diary for the year 1968/69 was not used, so the latest content is for 1967/68.

The diaries were acquired with both Archives 1 and Archives 2 but are now arranged together in one sequence. The RA2 print finding aid notes: “includes Russell’s Cambridge Pocket Diaries from 1953 to 1970. These diaries record not only his appointments but also his income as an author.”

BRPF: Printed material

This small series consists of a collection printed materials and Russell's handwritten notes relating to the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation and the Atlantic Peace Foundation. Includes:

A typed list of "Advisers" and "Scientific Advisers" to the BRPF. A typed copy of an announcement of Russell’s intention to speak at a meeting in Manchester on 28 April 1965. Notes on "Policy of the Foundation" in Russell’s hand. A brochure on the BRPF Statement by Russell on launching of BRPF; 1 printed copy A brochure detailing the work of the APF; includes a ‘covenant form’; 3 printed copies.
*A booklet outlining the work of the BRPF, marked "confidential"

The series was acquired as part of Archives 1.

BRPF: General correspondence

Series consists of petitions for political prisoners, requests for Russell to contribute writings to various kinds of publications, and inquiries about his philosophical writings, among other topics; replies (typescript copies) are from Russell, Edith Russell, or his staff. Also includes correspondence with individuals approached for the purpose sponsoring and/or becoming a member of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation. The series was acquired as part of Archives 1.

BRPF: General political correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with individuals known and unknown to Russell as well as with various campaigns with aims similar to those of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation. Correspondents include Cyrus Eaton, an American businessman and philanthropist who was a sponsor of the Pugwash Conferences, as well as organizations such as the Committee on Science and Freedom, the British Peace Committee, the British "Who Killed Kennedy?" Committee, etc. Also accompanying some letters are printed materials, such as news clippings, flyers, circular letters, off prints, newsletters, etc. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The chief criteria used in forming this [series] were the independence of the correspondents from governmental bodies, and their independence from the specific campaign organizations with which Russell was involved. Russell’s messages to demonstrations are often included in the contents."

BRPF: Financial correspondence relating to politics

Series consists of correspondence acknowledging financial gifts from donors and some correspondence with individuals approached to sponsor the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation. Also includes some business correspondence relating to the BRPF's activities, e.g., rates of payment for telephone service. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The BRPF was financed partly through donations and partly through Russell’s own resources. The former were very important to the BRPF, as they were a demonstration of popular support for the Foundation’s work. Such correspondence begins, however, in 1962, when Russell’s political work first received the financial support of others interested in it. The [series] also includes business correspondence on topics such as Russell’s frequently interrupted telephone service."

BRPF: World affairs

Series consists largely of correspondence with heads of state and governmental bodies about Russell's global concerns such as political prisoners and treatment of Soviet Jews, the Goldwater US presidential campaign, the Gaza Strip, the Vietnam War, etc. Among the correspondents are: Nikita Krushchev, Chou En-lai (Zhou Enlai), and U Thant. Also includes various printed materials such as press statements, news clippings, etc. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies. The series was acquired as a part of Archives 2.

BRPF: Political prisoners

Series consists of correspondence with heads of state and foreign governments, with individuals concerned about certain political prisoners, and letters to editors. The correspondence reveals Russell's staunch advocacy for political prisoners across the world. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] reflects the concern of Russell and the Peace Foundation to free political prisoners, whatever their nationality. Of necessity many of the negotiations with foreign governments had to be conducted with the strictest secrecy. The frequent successes could not be publicized, but the background to each can be ascertained in these files. The files are catalogued [in the print finding aid] on the basis of the first appearance of a given correspondent in a given file. It is only in these files that we learn of Russell’s connections with certain organizations—e.g., his honorary presidency of the Spanish Workers Defence Committee. Public statements and messages are also to be found here."

BRPF: Civil rights

Series consists of correspondence relating to political prisoners and Soviet Jews, as well as an array of other printed materials such as reports, case files, Russell's statements and typescript copies of his articles, etc. There are a number of files dedicated to the USA (e.g., the Kennedy Assassination), and a file relating to the Morton Sobell case. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This grouping of files overlaps somewhat with [series] 330 in that it contains papers dealing with both Soviet Jews (who wished to leave the USSR) and Soviet political prisoners. Many of the latter were also Jewish. These files, and especially those dealing with the United States, contain many statements by Russell and even typescripts of articles as early as “Using Beelzebub to Cast Out Satan”, published in the Manchester Guardian on 30 October 1951. There is also considerable printed material."

BRPF: Branch offices

Series consists largely of correspondence with BRPF's international branches and also contains specific files pertaining to conference preparation, drafts of bulletins, and correspondence with branch directors and advisers. Includes typescript copies of Russell's and his staff's outgoing correspondence.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “There are ... files dealing specifically with conferences sponsored, the Foundation’s directors and advisers, its executive officers (Christopher Farley and Ralph Schoenman), and efforts to win the Nobel Peace Prize for Russell. In one file (London School of Economics meeting, 1965) there is a reading text in Edith Russell’s hand of Russell’s speech entitled “The Labour Party’s Foreign Policy”. In another there is the Foundation Bulletin, vol. 1, no. 1 (February 1960), with various pre-publication versions. The contents of the files are listed [in the print finding aid] on the basis of the first appearance of a given correspondent in a given file."

BRPF: Miscellaneous politics

Series consists of correspondence relating to a variety of global events, affairs, and campaigns. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] contains a variety of specific files that do not fit well into any other political classification. The files [range] from the Cuban Missile Crisis to correspondence in the India file from 1970. Some files concern specific campaigns such as the South East Asia Appeal or the Committee of 100. The first file reveals an unsuccessful attempt at fund-raising through the offer of the use of Bertrand and Edith Russell’s names on commercial products."

IWCT: Members’ correspondence

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “ Correspondence between Russell and his staff and various persons who were members of the [International War Crimes] Tribunal. The files reveal that the idea of the Tribunal was first put forth in 1965. The correspondence ends in 1968 with Russell still hopeful for peace in Vietnam. He wrote to Gunther Anders: 'The present generation of Americans is, after all, the first to challenge the fundamental premises of the Cold War. The resurrection of critical thinking in the American universities offers some promise for the future.'" Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; also includes photocopies of some incoming correspondence.

IWCT: Refusals

Series consists of correspondence with individuals who were invited to serve on the International War Crimes Tribunal, but refused to do so. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The success of the Tribunal depended partly on the personages who would agree to serve on it. Of particular interest are the reasons given by those [included in this series] for declining to serve. Many supported the purpose of the Tribunal but considered themselves too partisan to be of use."

IWCT: Investigation teams and witnesses

Series consists of correspondence with individuals who served on the International War Crimes Tribunal's investigation teams in South East Asia regarding conditions in Vietnam, trip planning, and finances relating to the investigations. Also includes reports, statements, and articles about the investigations' findings. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “These files are of great importance for their first-hand reports of conditions in Vietnam. Many were never published. The background correspondence demonstrates the difficulties of preparing the major investigative effort which was the Tribunal."

IWCT: French office

Series consists of correspondence relating to the creation of the French office and to the first and second sessions of the International War Crimes Tribunal as well as reports, member lists, and pamphlets. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The French office and the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation experienced difficulties in cooperating in the multi-national Tribunal. Letters, memos, and notes in this single file record some of the difficulties - as well as the achievements."

IWCT: Working correspondence with Vietnamese

Series consists of correspondence relating to the presence of American troops in Southern Vietnam, alleged American war crimes in Vietnam, and the fight for Vietnam's independence. Notable is correspondence with the Democratic Republic of Vietnam's president, Ho Chi Minh, regarding the International War Crimes Tribunal. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies and photocopies.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The earliest item from Ho Chi Minh is dated 10 August 1964. The thick files indicate the symbolic importance of Russell's solidarity with the Vietnamese struggle for independence."

General correspondence on Vietnam

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] groups miscellaneous correspondence with individuals and organizations on the subject of the Vietnam War. The correspondence is international in scope and is organized alphabetically. This is the principal file for requests made to Russell to participate in anti-war activities sponsored by others." Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

IWCT: General correspondence (by country)

Series consists of correspondence with individuals and organizations offering support for the International War Crimes Tribunal, relating to the subject of anti-war campaigns occurring internationally, and requesting the participation of Russell in anti-war activities. Also includes typescript copies of statements, bulletins, and news clippings filed with related letters as well as typescript copies and some photocopies of outgoing correspondence.

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “Whereas [series] 376 is organized in one alphabetical sequence, Russell and his Foundation had the following material organized by country. There is considerable overlap in content between [series] 376 and [series] 377. [Series] 377 unaccountably ends with Japan - unless it be supposed that [series] 376 contains the correspondence that should have comprised the remainder of [series] 377."

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