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97th Birthday

Series consists of approximately 50 birthday letters addressed to Russell for his 97th birthday from individuals and organizations around the world who were both known and unknown to him. Many were sent by admirers of Russell. Russell died at age 97, and thus the items in this series mark his last birthday.

Frank Russell correspondence with Bertrand Russell

Series consists of correspondence between Russell and his elder brother, John Francis Stanley (Frank) Russell (1865-1931), spanning from Bertrand Russell's early life until two years before Frank Russell's death. The elder Russell became the 2nd Earl Russell while still a schoolboy in 1878, on the death of his grandfather, Lord John. He was married three times, to Mabel Edith Scott (m. 1890), Mollie Somerville (m. 1900), and author Elizabeth von Arnim (m. 1916).

Some letters in this series were written while Bertrand Russell was in Brixton Prison (May-Aug 1918) and while he was in China and Japan (Sep 1920-Aug 1921). Bertrand Russell's letters which were sent from prison (handwritten originals and typescript copies) contain messages for other individuals such as Lady Ottoline, Whitehead, and Elizabeth Russell, Frank's wife. Also includes correspondence relating to Frank Russell's divorce from Mabel Edith and the resulting felony charge for bigamy and the court case in 1901. The original handwritten letters are often accompanied with a typescript copy. Most of this series was acquired with Archives 1, with 3 items acquired with Archives 2.

Frank Russell personal items

Series consists of three journals (Jan-Oct 1880, July 1883-Feb 1884, and Feb-Aug 1884 and Jan-Feb 1890) belonging to Frank Russell; handwritten musical score with a song 'Little Frank Russell' (by his grandmother?); three poems in Frank Russell's handwriting, dated July 1883, Oct 1884 and Dec 1884; handwritten poems headed 'Granny to Frank, 1867’ and another in the same hand dated 1897; a poem in unidentified hand dated 1884; letter from Home Office (27 July 1911) enclosing copy of the Free Pardon granted in respect of Frank Russell's bigamy conviction; and manuscript and typescript copy of song lyrics presumably by Frank, headed ‘With Apologies to Messrs Moody & Sankey’. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell - letters from friends and family

Series consists of Frank Russell's correspondence with family and friends. Incoming correspondence largely consists of handwritten originals; outgoing correspondence consists of typescript copies. Includes copies of approximately 70 letters from Frank to George Santayana, 1887-1898, and 24 letters to Frank from the artist and playwright Laurence Housman, 1898-1925. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell v. Mabel Edith (1st wife) - matrimonial suit

Series consists of papers and correspondence relating to the 1891 matrimonial suit initiated by Frank Russell’s first wife, Mabel Edith Scott, on a charge of cruelty; in addition, there was a charge of a 'gross nature' concerning 'a man called X'. The trial lasted four days and resulted in Russell’s acquittal. Russell's solicitor was A.P. Doulton, of the firm Vandercom, Hardy, Oatway and Doulton, who handled much of Russell's correspondence at this time. Also includes two written testimonies for the court proceedings attesting to Frank Russell's character (filed at the end of the series), as well as Mabel Edith's own incoming correspondence (some photocopies) during 1890-1891 covering topics such as her dissatisfaction with her marriage and her desire to separate from and/or divorce Frank Russell. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell - politics and the law

Series consists of letters relating to Frank Russell's careers in politics and the legal profession. Many are from members of the House of Lords, where Russell first took his seat in 1887. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell - death: condolences, etc.

Series consists of: condolences sent to Bertrand Russell after Frank Russell's death in Marseilles on 3 March 1931 along with typescript copies of his replies; correspondence between Bertrand Russell and Frank's friend, Miss Otter, concerning the ceremony of scattering Frank's ashes, her being Frank's beneficiary, and the valuation of Frank's possessions. Also includes a 1970 screenplay, "Tried by Their Peers, 2. The Trial of Lord Russell (who died in 1931) for Bigamy--1901)", by Donald Thomas; and correspondence between Chris Farley and Barry Feinberg in 1970 regarding Bertrand Russell's 1931 statement about Frank Russell's death.

Russell relatives

Series consists of Bertrand Russell's correspondence with his Russell relatives ranging from his early life to later years and offers insight into significant events in Russell's life and the nature of his relationships with certain family members. Letters from family members often include opinions about Russell's writings and activities. Letters from Russell are typescript copies, and some incoming letters are typescript copies although most are handwritten or typed originals.

Some letters, such as those sent from his grandmother, Lady Frances Russell, and aunt, Lady Agatha Russell, refer to his decision not to enter into a political career. Lady Agatha also expresses disappointment regarding rumours of his extramarital affairs in the 1920s, and Aunt Georgiana Peel and her daughter Ethel disagree with his anti-war convictions during WWI.

Correspondence with his cousin Flora Russell from 1941-1967 depicts a close relationship that existed in Russell's later life; the correspondence includes friendly joking and invitations to visit. Russell also received letters from various distant cousins who wished to reconnect or to initiate communication.

Correspondents include his grandmother Lady Frances Russell (box 6.30), his uncles George Gilbert William Russell (box 6.30) and Rollo Russell (box 6.30, 11.08), his aunts Lady Agatha Russell (box 6.29), Lady Georgiana Peel (box 6.29), and Lady Charlotte Portal (box 6.29), and cousins.

Russell's cousins include:

Elizabeth Cobb (box 6.29)
Arthur D. Elliot (box 6.29)
Hugh Elliot (box 6.29)
Margaret Elliot (box 6.29)
Rachel Elliot (box 6.29)
Grace Forester (box 6.29, 11.08)
Margaret and John Lloyd (box 6.29, 11.08)
Leonora Russell de Mello (box 6.30)
Alicia [Russell] (6.30)
Anthony Russell (box 6.30)
Claud Russell (box 6.30)
Cosmo Russell (box 6.30)
Diana Russell (box 6.30)
Flora Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
George W.E. Russell (box 6.30)
Sir Guy Russell (box 6.30)
Harold Russell (box 6.30)
John W. Russell (box 6.30)
Martin Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Maud Russell (box 6.30, 11.08)
Raymond Russell (box 6.30)
Rupert Strong (box 6.30, 11.08)
Gwendoline Villiers (box 6.30)
Rollo Villiers (box 6.30)

Acquired primarily with Archives 1 with some additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Stanley relatives

Series consists of Bertrand Russell's correspondence with his Stanley relatives ranging from his early life to later years and offers insight into significant events in Russell's life and the nature of his relationships with certain family members. Russell's family members often include their opinions about his writings and activities in the correspondence. Some replies are written by Lady Edith Russell. Letters from Russell are typescript copies, and several incoming letters are typescript copies although most are handwritten or typed originals.

Correspondents include Lady Alice Avebury, Andrew Cunningham, Lady Agnes Grove, Lady Dorothy Henley, Aurea Howard, Geoffry Howard, Nancy Mitford, Elspeth Fox Pitt, G.L. Fox Pitt, Cecilia Roberts, uncle Lyulph Stanley, aunt Maude Stanley, and Fabia Stanley.

Of note are letters from Russell's uncle, Lyulph Stanley, who supported Russell during WWI; some correspondence with Nancy Mitford relating to her book Voltaire in Love; correspondence with Lady Dorothy Henley relating to her book about her mother titled Rosalind Howard, Countess Carlisle; and correspondence with his cousin Elspeth Fox Pitt during Russell's second time in prison in 1961.

Acquired primarily as part of Archives 1, with some additional items acquired as part of Archives 2.

Invitations to Lecture, attend functions and dinners, etc.

This series consists of invitations to lecture, attend functions and dinners, sponsor organizations, etc., largely from 1950 onward. Includes typescript copies of replies from Russell, Chris Farley, and Ralph Schoenman. Acquired as part of Archives 1 and 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states: "The invitations filed here are public invitations-mainly to make speeches and attend ceremonies. Some of the invitations came from organizations with which Russell had been associated long ago, such as the Cambridge Heretics. To some he sent messages to be read and possibly published. These files supplement the publishing and political correspondences, which also contain many invitations. The Trinity College, entry contains the business correspondence (mainly form letters) resulting from Russell's life fellowship."

Russell's dictation

Series consists of drafts of correspondence and of articles dictated by Russell to his wife, Edith, and handwritten by her. Most of the letters in this series are also related to correspondence in other series. Some replies are brief, such as those pertaining to meetings or those which merely acknowledge the receipt of letters. Also includes replies pertaining to Russell's peace activities, editorial letters, and letters relating to his opinions on morals, religion, family life, etc. Acquired as part of Archives 1 and 2. As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, "It is ... a very useful source of information, not least for being arranged chronologically."

Financial correspondence and related records

Four small series have been grouped together here: <b>751:</b> Russell’s correspondence with his accountant, Percy A. Popkin. <b>752:</b> Additional correspondence with various financial institutions, including Barclay’s Bank and Child & Col. Also includes three bank account “pass” books, one for Beacon Hill School from 1927-1931 and two for personal use from 1923-1929, 1929-1934. <b>753:</b> 14 bank deposit books (1950, 1952-60, 1962, 1968) and 176 cheque book stubs (1935-37, 1947-56, 1958-69). As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, the deposit books “record individual deposits, with the date, beneficiary and amount, but seldom with any note on the source,” while the cheque-book stubs “provide date, payee and amount. Sometimes they are filled out in other hands.” <b>754:</b> miscellaneous correspondence.

While much of the material relates to payments of various kinds, some of those payments relate to maintenance payments to his former wives, and matters relating to his children and grandchildren.

Legal Correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's legal firm, Coward, Chance & Co., relating Russell's letting of Telegraph House from his brother, 1927-1931; divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora, 1932-1935, as well as custody and schooling for their children, John and Kate, 1932-1936 (as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “this part of the correspondence is sometimes annotated by Russell in ball-point pen”); the mental health of Russell's eldest son John, 1960, 1964; custody, education, and finances of his grandchildren, Anne, Sarah, and Lucy (children of John Conrad and Susan Russell), 1961-1969; Russell's and Edith's week long imprisonment in Brixton Prison for the Committee of 100's anti-nuclear demonstrations, 1961; wills drafted for Russell and Edith, 1963; a legal amendment to the parentage of Harriet Russell (Dora Russell's daughter by Griffin Barry); and other matters. Also noted in the print finding aid: “Crompton Llewelyn Davies was Russell's chief contact” at Coward, Chance & Co. “until his death in 1935; L.E.P. Tylor succeeded him.”

1935 divorce documents - divorce from Dora Russell

Series consists of various legal documents used in the divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora Russell including two Heads of Agreements; affidavits and petitions by Russell and Dora Russell; affidavits from approximately fifteen individuals about Beacon Hill School; statements; draft of Russell's will and a deed poll; deed of gift; earnings record; memorandum; some correspondence and investigative reports; and, as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “’An Inventory of the Furniture and Household Effects at 'Telegraph House', Harting, Petersfield’. This document is interesting for its listing of the books in Telegraph House, among other things.”

"Later" Legal and Business Correspondence

Series consists largely of legal correspondence relating to alleged press abuse that Russell experienced in newspapers such as The Economist and Daily Mirror, and other publications; also includes documentation on various lawsuits. As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “Russell felt obliged to check journalistic scurrility when it blackened his name. The Penthouse file contains, in addition to the first issue of the British edition (March 1965), two copies of a pre-publication brochure falsely listing Russell among the future contributors.”

This series also includes business correspondence and financial statements relating to the purchase, sublet, and rental of properties as well as dividends, account summaries, etc. Much of the correspondence is between B.M. Birnberg & Co. and Russell, Ralph Schoenman, or Chris Farley. Includes typescript copies of Russell's outgoing correspondence as well as some typescript copies of incoming correspondence.

Legal actions: First World War, the Everett case, 1916

Series consists of a few documents relating to legal actions surrounding the distribution of the so-called ‘Everett leaflet’ by the No-Conscription Fellowship (NCF) in April, 1916. The leaflet, entitled ‘Two Years’ Hard Labour for Refusing to Disobey the Dictates of Conscience,’ was critical of the harsh treatment given Ernest Everett, a conscientious objector. After others were arrested for distributing the leaflet, Russell publicly acknowledged writing it, for which he was charged, convicted, and fined. Included are: NCF circulars; correspondence; a manuscript of Russell's defence speech for his trial on 5 June 1916; a pamphlet and reports of the court proceedings; Russell's bail certificate dated 10 June 1916; and typescript copies of the prosecutions and sentences of other conscientious objectors.

Legal actions: First World War, Rex v. Russell, 1918

Series consists of a few documents relating to the 1918 court case for which Russell was convicted under the Defence of the Realm Act and sentenced to Brixton prison. The charge resulted from comments made by Russell in the article ‘The German Peace Offer’ which had been published in The Tribunal on January 3, 1918. Included are: a letter from Russell's solicitor sent to Russell while in Brixton Prison; a copy of a petition protesting the imprisonment of Russell; a copy of a document entitled "Use of United States Military in Industrial Disputes" which Russell intended to use in his defence, as indicated by his attached handwritten note; and other documents.

Legal actions: City College of New York

Series contains material relating to the aftermath of the February 1940 announcement that Russell had been appointed to a professorship at the City College of New York. Many on the American right rallied to oppose the appointment, and a civil suit was launched against the College. Ultimately, the appointment never occurred. Included are: correspondence with the College and other academics and members of the legal profession; letters of support or abuse from the public; news clippings about Russell's professorship and suit filed together with related correspondence; draft statements and biographical notes about Russell; court records; and a file dedicated to the correspondence of Patricia Russell, Russell's wife, relating to the case including copies of her replies to letters on behalf of Russell. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a single letter (from Harriet M. Lovell to Russell, 1940) acquired with Archives 2.

Legal actions: Barnes Case (1940-1945)

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s legal case against Dr. Alfred Barnes and the Barnes Foundation for dismissing him from his position as a lecturer at the Foundation. Dr. Barnes had recruited Russell to begin lecturing in January 1941 but ended up dismissing him in December 1942. Russell won his breach of contract suit and was awarded $20,000 in unpaid salary. Included in the series are: Russell's correspondence with Dr. Barnes and his Foundation, which gives insight into the state of their professional relationship; correspondence with Russell's lawyers; news clippings and legal documents. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Other ‘cases’: Waller, Bilainkin, Britton

The series grouped here relate to cases or controversies for which Russell’s support was solicited. <b>831</b>: Correspondence with Guy Waller, news clippings, and drafts of articles, 1955-56. Waller had written articles for The Sunday Chronicle describing the effects of radioactive fallout, for which he was greatly criticized. He sought Russell’s support. <b>833</b>: Correspondence with George Bilainkin, 1956-63, who attempted to secure Russell's support in his allegations that his ex-wife, Lillian, who had custody of their daughter, was guilty of cruelty to the child. Also includes a copy of Bilainkin's affidavit, a petition, statements, a summary of the case, and other documents. <b>834</b>: Correspondence with Lionel Britton and Elizabeth Barber, and news clippings, 1956-57. Britton completed a George Bernard Shaw play that had been left unfinished at the time of Shaw’s death, but was prevented from publishing it by the Public Trustee. Britton enlisted Russell’s support against the decision. Barber was with the Society of Authors. <b>Note:</b> series number 832 was not used.

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