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Archivistische beschrijving
Reeks
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Publishers' contracts

Series consists of approximately 90 publishers contracts of which most are from the publishers listed in series 410, and several letters relating to the contracts. Also includes other financial documents, such as a list of Russell's earnings in 1950.

Independent Labour Party

Series includes letters from Independent Labour Party members, invitations for Russell to lecture at meetings, a news clipping, and other letters relating to general matters of the ILP. Also includes Russell's 1919 ILP membership card; he had joined the ILP in 1917. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

No-Conscription Fellowship

Series consists of correspondence among members of the No-Conscription Fellowship, of which Russell was a leading member; the group opposed conscription in Britain during the First World War. Also includes circulars, forms, proposals, reports, and flyers. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Legal actions: First World War, the Everett case, 1916

Series consists of a few documents relating to legal actions surrounding the distribution of the so-called ‘Everett leaflet’ by the No-Conscription Fellowship (NCF) in April, 1916. The leaflet, entitled ‘Two Years’ Hard Labour for Refusing to Disobey the Dictates of Conscience,’ was critical of the harsh treatment given Ernest Everett, a conscientious objector. After others were arrested for distributing the leaflet, Russell publicly acknowledged writing it, for which he was charged, convicted, and fined. Included are: NCF circulars; correspondence; a manuscript of Russell's defence speech for his trial on 5 June 1916; a pamphlet and reports of the court proceedings; Russell's bail certificate dated 10 June 1916; and typescript copies of the prosecutions and sentences of other conscientious objectors.

Legal actions: First World War, Rex v. Russell, 1918

Series consists of a few documents relating to the 1918 court case for which Russell was convicted under the Defence of the Realm Act and sentenced to Brixton prison. The charge resulted from comments made by Russell in the article ‘The German Peace Offer’ which had been published in The Tribunal on January 3, 1918. Included are: a letter from Russell's solicitor sent to Russell while in Brixton Prison; a copy of a petition protesting the imprisonment of Russell; a copy of a document entitled "Use of United States Military in Industrial Disputes" which Russell intended to use in his defence, as indicated by his attached handwritten note; and other documents.

Publishing correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's publishers as well as requests for Russell to contribute writings for various journals, pamphlets, etc. Also includes some book covers from Allen & Unwin for some of Russell's published works. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; some received letters are photocopies.

Acquired as part of Archives 1 and Archives 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states that the series "represent the general correspondence of Russell and his staff with publishers of every description. Includes some Vietnam publishing correspondence. There are several files with George Allen & Unwin Ltd., Russell's English publisher since 1916, including one stray letter from 1919. The general correspondence contains much information about translations of Russell's works - e.g., a Russian translation of "Satan in the Suburbs" in Zvezda, 1963."

Invitations to Lecture, attend functions and dinners, etc.

This series consists of invitations to lecture, attend functions and dinners, sponsor organizations, etc., largely from 1950 onward. Includes typescript copies of replies from Russell, Chris Farley, and Ralph Schoenman. Acquired as part of Archives 1 and 2. The print finding aid for Archives 2 states: "The invitations filed here are public invitations-mainly to make speeches and attend ceremonies. Some of the invitations came from organizations with which Russell had been associated long ago, such as the Cambridge Heretics. To some he sent messages to be read and possibly published. These files supplement the publishing and political correspondences, which also contain many invitations. The Trinity College, entry contains the business correspondence (mainly form letters) resulting from Russell's life fellowship."

Financial correspondence and related records

Four small series have been grouped together here: <b>751:</b> Russell’s correspondence with his accountant, Percy A. Popkin. <b>752:</b> Additional correspondence with various financial institutions, including Barclay’s Bank and Child & Col. Also includes three bank account “pass” books, one for Beacon Hill School from 1927-1931 and two for personal use from 1923-1929, 1929-1934. <b>753:</b> 14 bank deposit books (1950, 1952-60, 1962, 1968) and 176 cheque book stubs (1935-37, 1947-56, 1958-69). As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, the deposit books “record individual deposits, with the date, beneficiary and amount, but seldom with any note on the source,” while the cheque-book stubs “provide date, payee and amount. Sometimes they are filled out in other hands.” <b>754:</b> miscellaneous correspondence.

While much of the material relates to payments of various kinds, some of those payments relate to maintenance payments to his former wives, and matters relating to his children and grandchildren.

Labour Party

Series consists of letters from the Labour Party relating to Russell's participation in the House of Lords and his membership in the Labour Party, circulars, the annual report for 1962, an official response to Russell's resignation as a party member in 1965 due to policy regarding Vietnam, and six of Russell's Labour Party membership cards dated between 1951 and 1964. Russell had contested the Chelsea riding for Labour in 1922.

Legal Correspondence

Series consists of correspondence with Russell's legal firm, Coward, Chance & Co., relating Russell's letting of Telegraph House from his brother, 1927-1931; divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora, 1932-1935, as well as custody and schooling for their children, John and Kate, 1932-1936 (as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “this part of the correspondence is sometimes annotated by Russell in ball-point pen”); the mental health of Russell's eldest son John, 1960, 1964; custody, education, and finances of his grandchildren, Anne, Sarah, and Lucy (children of John Conrad and Susan Russell), 1961-1969; Russell's and Edith's week long imprisonment in Brixton Prison for the Committee of 100's anti-nuclear demonstrations, 1961; wills drafted for Russell and Edith, 1963; a legal amendment to the parentage of Harriet Russell (Dora Russell's daughter by Griffin Barry); and other matters. Also noted in the print finding aid: “Crompton Llewelyn Davies was Russell's chief contact” at Coward, Chance & Co. “until his death in 1935; L.E.P. Tylor succeeded him.”

Radio and television requests

Series consists of correspondence and other documents regarding Russell's radio broadcasts and television appearances, primarily with the BBC, but also including US networks ABC, CBS and NBC; Canada’s CBC; Australia’s ABC; Polskie Radio, Radio Free Europe, and many others. The BBC material includes a file on “The Life and Times of Bertrand Russell”, a 92nd birthday tribute; it contains a script, shot lists, and other documents relating to the May, 1964 broadcast, featuring Robert Bolt (interviewer), A.J. Ayer, Robert Boothby, Michael Foot, Julian Huxley, Miles Malleson and Leonard Woof. Also included are letters regarding a 1959 broadcast relating to Wisdom of the West, and correspondence with journalists such as Alistair Cooke, Kenneth Harris and Woodrow Wyatt. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a few additional items acquired with Archives 2.

Moving images: films, videos and DVDs

Series consists of:

(1) 1 film acquired with Archives 1: BBC interview on ‘Wales Today’

(2) 4 films acquired with Archives 2: 3 relating to Vietnam, as well as interviews with Ralph Miliband conducted in 1965 (“Man and the 20th Cenutury”, “War and Peace”, and “Weatlh and Poverty”).

(3) Several films, videos and DVDs acquired as ‘Recent Acquisitions’, or Archives 3, including: the 1959 interviews with Woodrow Wyatt under the umbrella title “Bertrand Russell Speaks His Mind” (“Bertrand Russell Discusses Happiness”; “Bertrand Russell Discusses Philosophy”; “Bertrand Russell Discusses Power”); “The Life and Times of Bertrand Russell”; “Prospects of Mankind”; “Small World” (debate with Edward Teller on nuclear disarmament); “Three Passions of Bertrand Russell”; 1939 home movie entitled Sundays at Malibu Encinal; footage of the Nobel ceremony; CND demonstration at Trafalgar Square; appearance on the Merv Griffin Show; CBS news coverage of Russell’s death; and more.

Frank Russell - death: condolences, etc.

Series consists of: condolences sent to Bertrand Russell after Frank Russell's death in Marseilles on 3 March 1931 along with typescript copies of his replies; correspondence between Bertrand Russell and Frank's friend, Miss Otter, concerning the ceremony of scattering Frank's ashes, her being Frank's beneficiary, and the valuation of Frank's possessions. Also includes a 1970 screenplay, "Tried by Their Peers, 2. The Trial of Lord Russell (who died in 1931) for Bigamy--1901)", by Donald Thomas; and correspondence between Chris Farley and Barry Feinberg in 1970 regarding Bertrand Russell's 1931 statement about Frank Russell's death.

Patricia Spence correspondence (letters received)

Series consists of mostly letters received by Patricia (Peter) Spence from a variety of correspondents, including Russell’s daughter, Kate (Katharine Tait); Spence’s mother, “Mrs. Spence”; Gamel Brenan, Gerald Brenan, Alice Crunden, Moya Llewelyn Davies, Joan Malleson, Miles Malleson, Ottoline Morell, Edna Pearce; and many others. As noted in the RA2 finding aid: “Some letters are addressed to Russell and a few others to both.” Received as part of Archives 2.

Patricia would become Russell’s third wife in 1936. She had served as governess to Russell’s children, Kate and John. Russell separated from the children’s mother, Dora Black, in 1932; they were divorced in 1936.

1935 divorce documents - divorce from Dora Russell

Series consists of various legal documents used in the divorce proceedings between Russell and Dora Russell including two Heads of Agreements; affidavits and petitions by Russell and Dora Russell; affidavits from approximately fifteen individuals about Beacon Hill School; statements; draft of Russell's will and a deed poll; deed of gift; earnings record; memorandum; some correspondence and investigative reports; and, as noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, “’An Inventory of the Furniture and Household Effects at 'Telegraph House', Harting, Petersfield’. This document is interesting for its listing of the books in Telegraph House, among other things.”

Sound recordings

Series consists of:

(1) 49 reel to reel recordings, 1939-1963, acquired with Archives 1; most have been converted to cassettes; includes: interviews on various radio programs; Russell speeches at mass meetings of the Committee of 100 at Trafalgar square and other gatherings; Russell’s 90 birthday concert; and more.

(2) 28 reel to reel recordings, 1963-1968, acquired with Archives 2; all have been converted to cassettes; most of the recordings deal with the International War Crimes Tribunal, while others include radio interviews and other topics.

(3) ca. 170 recordings (reel to reel, cassette, vinyl, and CDs), 1938-1996, acquired as ‘Recent Acquisitions’, or Archives 3; includes: numerous interviews with and speeches by Russell, but also many interviews with various people about Russell, and other material.

Legal actions: City College of New York

Series contains material relating to the aftermath of the February 1940 announcement that Russell had been appointed to a professorship at the City College of New York. Many on the American right rallied to oppose the appointment, and a civil suit was launched against the College. Ultimately, the appointment never occurred. Included are: correspondence with the College and other academics and members of the legal profession; letters of support or abuse from the public; news clippings about Russell's professorship and suit filed together with related correspondence; draft statements and biographical notes about Russell; court records; and a file dedicated to the correspondence of Patricia Russell, Russell's wife, relating to the case including copies of her replies to letters on behalf of Russell. Most of the series was acquired with Archives 1, with a single letter (from Harriet M. Lovell to Russell, 1940) acquired with Archives 2.

Legal actions: Barnes Case (1940-1945)

Series consists of material relating to Russell’s legal case against Dr. Alfred Barnes and the Barnes Foundation for dismissing him from his position as a lecturer at the Foundation. Dr. Barnes had recruited Russell to begin lecturing in January 1941 but ended up dismissing him in December 1942. Russell won his breach of contract suit and was awarded $20,000 in unpaid salary. Included in the series are: Russell's correspondence with Dr. Barnes and his Foundation, which gives insight into the state of their professional relationship; correspondence with Russell's lawyers; news clippings and legal documents. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

"Cranks"

Series consists of letters addressed to Russell which are written in a nonsensical, ridiculous and/or indignant manner. Some crank mail elicited a response from Russell or his secretary, Ralph Schoenman, and may include typescript copies of replies, but most letters were left unanswered. A considerable amount of letters are from Peter Askey; one box (11.82) contains only letters received from him. Many letters were also sent anonymously.

Acquired as part of Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “Every well-known figure must receive crank mail, but Russell seems to have received more than his share. Possibly it was his reputation as a sage that attracted the letters. His staff regularly annotated such mail "crank". … While there may be nothing so dismal as an anonymous crank letter, pseudonymous crank letters can be very entertaining. See, for example, the letters and enclosed "cheques" (ranging from $5000 to $2,000,000,000) from the Virgin Express Alexandra I.”

'Save Europe Now'

Series consists primarily of letters from Victor Gollancz, chairman of Save Europe Now, which was concerned with post-WWII relief and reconstruction in central Europe; some of the letters are addressed to Lady [Patricia] Russell. Also includes other correspondence, circulars, printed materials, resolutions of meetings, draft statements, copies of open letters to the Prime Minister and Minister of Food, various reports on the treatment of displaced persons in Eastern Europe as well as conditions in Europe generally and in the four zones of Germany, and other items. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

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