Print preview Close

Showing 91 results

Archival description
Series
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

BRPF: Vietnam solidarity campaign

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The Vietnam Solidarity Campaign was formed about June 1966. The Peace Foundation was a leading sponsor. These files--arranged in chronological order--trace the history of the Campaign's activities and its relationships with similar organizations in Britain (such as the Vietnam Ad Hoc Committee). The files are particularly useful for their copies of minutes, articles, pamphlets, form letters, Member's Bulletin, and other forms of propagating the views of the VSC."

Includes correspondence, photocopies and typescript copies of agendas and minutes, circulars and form letters, drafts of press statements, several pamphlets and leaflets, a number of issues of the Vietnam Solidarity Bulletin (June 1966-Nov 1966), and news clippings. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies; includes several photocopies of received letters.

BRPF: Visa campaign for Vietnamese

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “In the summer of 1965 the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation attempted to bring representatives of the National Liberation Front to Britain for public and private meetings. Visas were denied them by Her Majesty's Government. A public campaign was mounted to win support for the granting of visas."

Includes correspondence, typescript copies of statements, and news clippings regarding the campaign to obtain visas for three spokesmen of the National Liberation Front in Southern Vietnam: Professor Nguyen Van Hieu, Dinh Ba Thi, and Pham Van Chuong. Includes letters to editors from The Statesmen and The Times, correspondence with the Home Secretary, and visa application forms for two of three NLF spokesmen. Letters from Russell are typescript copies.

BRPF: World Vietnam Committee

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “The World Vietnam Committee was initiated by the Peace Foundation following the first International War Crimes Tribunal. Many invitations to join the Committee were sent out over Russell's signature, but the Committee seems never to have been brought fully into being.”

Includes a draft for the WVC's constitution and correspondence which includes invitations for individuals to join the anticipated committee and notifications of the postponement of the committee. Letters from Russell are typescript copies; letters received are photocopies.

BRPF: World affairs

Series consists largely of correspondence with heads of state and governmental bodies about Russell's global concerns such as political prisoners and treatment of Soviet Jews, the Goldwater US presidential campaign, the Gaza Strip, the Vietnam War, etc. Among the correspondents are: Nikita Krushchev, Chou En-lai (Zhou Enlai), and U Thant. Also includes various printed materials such as press statements, news clippings, etc. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies. The series was acquired as a part of Archives 2.

Birthday cards, 1950-1969

Series consists of approximately 500 cards congratulating Russell on his birthdays over the years 1950-1969. Includes cards from family members, friends, and other individuals and organizational bodies. Most were acquired with Archives 1, while a few cards dated 1961 were acquired with Archives 2.

Christmas cards, 1950-1969

Series consists of approximately 1,500 cards wishing Russell a Merry Christmas and/or a Happy New Year as well as some typescript copies of replies written by Russell and Edith Russell. Includes cards from family members, friends, and other individuals or organizational bodies.

Condolences on Russell's death: answered by Lady Russell

As noted in the Archives 2 print finding aid, "Edith Russell received many condolences" following Bertrand Russell's death on 2 February 1970 and "she personally replied to" those included in this series (though copies of her replies are not here). Of note are letters from Dora Russell and John Conrad Russell offering condolences and revealing that they had intended to visit Russell just before his death.

Condolences on Russell's death: general

Series consists of condolences on Russell's death addressed to the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation, members of Russell's staff, or his wife Edith Russell. The condolences are from various individuals and organizations who knew Russell personally or were influenced by his life's work. Includes some typed copies of replies from Ken Coates and Christopher Farley, often on behalf of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation or his wife Edith Russell.

Congress for Cultural Freedom

Series largely consists of Russell's correspondence with the Congress for Cultural Freedom and the Committee on Science and Freedom as well as reports relating to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956, meeting minutes, news clippings, and bulletins. Letters from Russell are typescript copies. The Congress was concerned with the defense of intellectual freedom, particularly in eastern Europe. Russell was an honorary president but severed ties in 1956 because of the anti-communist position of the Congress' American branch. Series acquired as part of Archives 1.

Financial correspondence and related records

Four small series have been grouped together here: <b>751:</b> Russell’s correspondence with his accountant, Percy A. Popkin. <b>752:</b> Additional correspondence with various financial institutions, including Barclay’s Bank and Child & Col. Also includes three bank account “pass” books, one for Beacon Hill School from 1927-1931 and two for personal use from 1923-1929, 1929-1934. <b>753:</b> 14 bank deposit books (1950, 1952-60, 1962, 1968) and 176 cheque book stubs (1935-37, 1947-56, 1958-69). As noted in the print finding aid for Archives 2, the deposit books “record individual deposits, with the date, beneficiary and amount, but seldom with any note on the source,” while the cheque-book stubs “provide date, payee and amount. Sometimes they are filled out in other hands.” <b>754:</b> miscellaneous correspondence.

While much of the material relates to payments of various kinds, some of those payments relate to maintenance payments to his former wives, and matters relating to his children and grandchildren.

Frank Russell - death: condolences, etc.

Series consists of: condolences sent to Bertrand Russell after Frank Russell's death in Marseilles on 3 March 1931 along with typescript copies of his replies; correspondence between Bertrand Russell and Frank's friend, Miss Otter, concerning the ceremony of scattering Frank's ashes, her being Frank's beneficiary, and the valuation of Frank's possessions. Also includes a 1970 screenplay, "Tried by Their Peers, 2. The Trial of Lord Russell (who died in 1931) for Bigamy--1901)", by Donald Thomas; and correspondence between Chris Farley and Barry Feinberg in 1970 regarding Bertrand Russell's 1931 statement about Frank Russell's death.

Frank Russell - letters from friends and family

Series consists of Frank Russell's correspondence with family and friends. Incoming correspondence largely consists of handwritten originals; outgoing correspondence consists of typescript copies. Includes copies of approximately 70 letters from Frank to George Santayana, 1887-1898, and 24 letters to Frank from the artist and playwright Laurence Housman, 1898-1925. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell - politics and the law

Series consists of letters relating to Frank Russell's careers in politics and the legal profession. Many are from members of the House of Lords, where Russell first took his seat in 1887. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell correspondence with Bertrand Russell

Series consists of correspondence between Russell and his elder brother, John Francis Stanley (Frank) Russell (1865-1931), spanning from Bertrand Russell's early life until two years before Frank Russell's death. The elder Russell became the 2nd Earl Russell while still a schoolboy in 1878, on the death of his grandfather, Lord John. He was married three times, to Mabel Edith Scott (m. 1890), Mollie Somerville (m. 1900), and author Elizabeth von Arnim (m. 1916).

Some letters in this series were written while Bertrand Russell was in Brixton Prison (May-Aug 1918) and while he was in China and Japan (Sep 1920-Aug 1921). Bertrand Russell's letters which were sent from prison (handwritten originals and typescript copies) contain messages for other individuals such as Lady Ottoline, Whitehead, and Elizabeth Russell, Frank's wife. Also includes correspondence relating to Frank Russell's divorce from Mabel Edith and the resulting felony charge for bigamy and the court case in 1901. The original handwritten letters are often accompanied with a typescript copy. Most of this series was acquired with Archives 1, with 3 items acquired with Archives 2.

Frank Russell personal items

Series consists of three journals (Jan-Oct 1880, July 1883-Feb 1884, and Feb-Aug 1884 and Jan-Feb 1890) belonging to Frank Russell; handwritten musical score with a song 'Little Frank Russell' (by his grandmother?); three poems in Frank Russell's handwriting, dated July 1883, Oct 1884 and Dec 1884; handwritten poems headed 'Granny to Frank, 1867’ and another in the same hand dated 1897; a poem in unidentified hand dated 1884; letter from Home Office (27 July 1911) enclosing copy of the Free Pardon granted in respect of Frank Russell's bigamy conviction; and manuscript and typescript copy of song lyrics presumably by Frank, headed ‘With Apologies to Messrs Moody & Sankey’. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

Frank Russell v. Mabel Edith (1st wife) - matrimonial suit

Series consists of papers and correspondence relating to the 1891 matrimonial suit initiated by Frank Russell’s first wife, Mabel Edith Scott, on a charge of cruelty; in addition, there was a charge of a 'gross nature' concerning 'a man called X'. The trial lasted four days and resulted in Russell’s acquittal. Russell's solicitor was A.P. Doulton, of the firm Vandercom, Hardy, Oatway and Doulton, who handled much of Russell's correspondence at this time. Also includes two written testimonies for the court proceedings attesting to Frank Russell's character (filed at the end of the series), as well as Mabel Edith's own incoming correspondence (some photocopies) during 1890-1891 covering topics such as her dissatisfaction with her marriage and her desire to separate from and/or divorce Frank Russell. Acquired as part of Archives 1.

General correspondence on Vietnam

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “This [series] groups miscellaneous correspondence with individuals and organizations on the subject of the Vietnam War. The correspondence is international in scope and is organized alphabetically. This is the principal file for requests made to Russell to participate in anti-war activities sponsored by others." Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

Heads of State

Series consists predominately of correspondence with heads of state and other political leaders in various countries relating to issues of international politics, including the Cuban missile crisis, the Sino-Indian border dispute, the war in Vietnam, Arab-Israeli relations, etc. Among the correspondents are Chou En-lai (Zhou Enlai) of China, Jawaharlal Nehru of India, Ayub Khan and Zulfikar Ali Bhutto of Pakistan, Nikita Krushchev of the USSR, Secretary General U Thant of the United Nations, Ho Chi Minh of Vietnam, and many others. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

By 1963, the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation had been established, and the affairs of the BRPF are also reflected here. Accordingly, there is some overlap with the BRPF series (311 onward). There is also overlap with series 640 World Affairs. The files are arranged alphabetically by name of country, and also include material relating to the United Nations.

Series was acquired as part of Archives 1.

IWCT: Correspondence with Newspapers

Series forms part of Archives 2 and consists of several hundred letters to editors as well as news clippings, articles, and statements relating to the Vietnam War. The letters to editors range in tone and length. Some letters, such as those with The New York Times, contain disagreements and rebuttals regarding Russell's views about American military conduct in Vietnam; other letters contain expositions of American conduct in Vietnam or summaries of the International War Crime Tribunal's sessions to those newspapers or periodicals which had not yet published any coverage of the sessions. Letters from Russell and his staff are typescript copies.

At the end of the series, there are various articles relating to the IWCT sessions as well as published and unpublished articles regarding the objectives and work of the IWCT. As noted in the RA2 print finding aid, “Ralph Schoenman's name appears as the author of several of them.” There is also material by Conrad Russell. Also includes the verdicts and results of the IWCT's first session in Stockholm from 2-10 May 1967 and of the IWCT's second session in Copenhagen from 20-30 November 1967.

Among those newspapers corresponded with are:

The Times
Washington Post
The New York Times
Reporter Magazine
The Observer
Toronto Star Weekly
New York Herald Tribune
I.F. Stone's Weekly
Peace News
The Guardian
Sunday Times
Toronto Star
Bristol Evening Post
Dagens Nyheter
Daily Telegraph
New Statesmen
Newsweek
San Francisco Sunday Examiner and Chronicle
Delo
Detroit News
Tribune
Le Monde
Spokesman-Review
National Guardian
Combat
Manila Times
The Economist
New Leader
New Society
Morning Star
Ramparts
Der Spiegel
The Melbourne Age
The Star-Bulletin

IWCT: Essays, meetings, and reports

The series was acquired with Archives 2, the print finding aid for which states: “These files open with agendas and minutes of the organizing sessions for the International War Crimes Tribunal, held in London, November 1966. They continue with drafts of declarations, transcriptions of the Stockholm sessions of the Tribunal held in the Spring of 1967, and Russell's messages to the Stockholm sessions held later in 1967. There are many other documents, some of them published in Against the Crime of Silence or Prevent the Crime of Silence.”

Results 21 to 40 of 91