Showing 805 results

Authority record

Barclay, John

  • RC0643
  • Person
  • 1898-1966

John Barclay (1898-1966) was active in the Peace Pledge Union in the late 1930s; he was one of the official sponsors of the Union in 1939. The photographs are of Peace Pledge Union activities and participants in 1937-1938 including John Barclay, Dick Sheppard, Maurice Rowntree, Vera Brittain, J. Middleton Murry, Max Plowman and others. Barclay's son, Anthony, has written a brief memoir of his father. It is located in the master file.

Baring, Maurice

  • RC0676
  • Person
  • 1874-1945

Maurice Baring, poet, essayist, literary critic, and novelist, was born in London on 27 April 1874. He was educated at Eaton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He is credited with introducing Chekhov's work to the West. He died in Beauley, Inverness-shire, on 14 December 1845.

Bax, Clifford

  • RC0616
  • Person
  • 1886-1962

Clifford Bax, critic, editor, and playwright, was born on 13 July 1886 in Knightsbridge, London. He was educated at the Slade and then the Heatherly Art Schools, finishing his education in Germany. He founded the Phoenix Society (1919-1926) to revive important Elizabethan and Restoration dramas. His first play to be staged was The Poetasters of Ispahan in 1912 and his plays continued to be staged regularly until 1946. Bax died on 18 November 1962.

Beatty Brothers Limited

  • RC0357
  • Corporate body
  • 1874-1969

Beatty Brothers Limited was established in Fergus, Ontario in 1874 by George and Matthew Beatty. In its earliest years the company was primarily a family business involved in the manufacture of farm equipment. At the Toronto Industrial Exhibition in 1879, the company was awarded a bronze medal for engineering excellence. During the same period the two brothers also purchased the Grindley farm implement factory with water power on the Grand River. It manufactured reapers, mowers, straw cutters, land rollers, single and gang plows, and even stoves and cast-iron kitchen utensils.

From the turn of the century to 1961, the company continued to expand. Other companies were purchased: the James Provan Company of Oshawa, Whitman and Barnes of St. Catharines, Cameron and Dunn of Strathroy, Tolton Brothers of Guelph, Emerson and Campbell of Tweed, Wortman and Ward of London, Ont., etc. By 1928 the Beatty product line spanned more than 600 items. Factories in Fergus and London, Ontario employed 600 people, and a further 800 people were employed in Great Britain. There were branches and stores across Canada; by 1939 there were also stores in Australia and New Zealand.

In May 1961 the Beatty family sold their shares to Ralph M. Barford, Robert A. Stevens, and George Gardiner. In 1969 the company amalgamated with General Steel Wares to form GSW Limited.

Becker, Paul

  • RC0146
  • Person
  • 1938-

Paul Becker was active in many student organizations. In 1960 he was President of the Student United Nations Association in Canada and served as National Federation of Canadian University Students (NFCUS) Chairman at the University of Western Ontario. For the academic year 1961-1962, he was the Vice-President for International Affairs of NFCUS. His predecessor in the job was Jacques Gérin, whose files he inherited. Gérin's files form a separate fonds. Becker's portfolio brought him in contact with the Coordinating Secretariat of the International Unions of Students (COSEC) in The Netherlands. In 1962 Becker served as the NFCUS representative on the World University Service of Canada (WUSC) and then became Vice-Chairman of WUSC. Working for WUSC, he organized an appeal for funds for the National Union of Israeli Students. He served as secretary of the Canadian Committee for the World Assembly of Youth (WAY) and of the Advisory Committee to the Department of the Secretary of State, Canadian Citizenship Branch. He was active as a conference organizer. In 1963 he was the conference secretary for the Conference on Student Mental Health; in 1964 he organized the Canadian Student Journalists conference. He was also on the Board of Directors for Jeunesse Canada Monde/Canada World Youth. He was on the National Executive Council for the International Year of Cooperation (ICY) in Canada in 1965. He was also a member of the Preparatory Youth Committee and Youth Advisory Committee for EXPO 1967 in Montreal. Becker remained in correspondence with NFCUS after it was re-organized as the Canadian Union of Students in 1964.

Beckett, Samuel

  • RC0229
  • Person
  • 1906-1989

Samuel Beckett was an Irish author and playwright, born at Foxrock, near Dublin on 13 April 1906. He was educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen, and at Trinity College, Dublin, where he read English, French, and Italian. He lived mainly in France from 1932 onwards. His most famous play, En attendant Godot was published in 1952. He was awarded the Nobel prize for literature in 1969. He died in Paris on 22 December 1989

Beecroft, Laura G.

  • RC0662
  • Person
  • [18--]-[19--]

Laura Beecroft, a missionary with the Christian and Missionary Alliance, began a period of work with the Christian and Missionary Alliance Girls' Training School in Jerusalem, Palestine during the year of 1912. Laura was a missionary and teacher of several subjects including history, Bible studies, and English grammar, composition, spelling and reading. Laura remained in this position until 1915, when in January of that year she relocated to Cairo, Egypt and studied Arabic. Later that year, Laura joined her mother and sister in New York until 1920 when she returned to the American Missionary School in Jerusalem for an unknown period of time.

Bellamy, George Anne

  • RC0749
  • Person
  • 1731?-1788

George Anne Bellamy, actress, was born in Fingal, Ireland, on 23 April 1731, possibly 1733, although 1727 is a likely possibility as well. She appeared on the stage in both London and Dublin in the era of Sheridan and Garrick. Her life, however, was marked by gambling and extravagance and her later years by suffering and debt. Her memoirs were published in 1785 in six volumes, An Apology for the Life of George Anne Bellamy. She died on 16 February 1788.

Benevides, Lucy

  • RC0613
  • Person
  • 1919-1981

Lucy Benevides, originally from Bermuda, served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War II. Once the Air Force was re-opened to women in 1951, she re-joined, eventually rising to the rank of captain. She was stationed at Metz, France in the 1950s. RCAF No. 1 Air Division was located there during the 1950s and 1960s in order the meet Canada's NATO air defence commitments in Europe.

Bengough, J. W.

  • RC0228
  • Person
  • 1851-1923

John Wilson Bengough, cartoonist, was born on 7 April 1851 in Toronto and educated in the Whitby district and grammar schools. In 1873 he founded Grip, a humorous weekly. He provided cartoons for the publication as well as articles and poems for twenty years. In 1892 he became the cartoonist of the Montreal Star before moving on to the Toronto Globe. His cartoons also appeared in the Morning Chronicle in London, England. An advocate of the single tax, prohibition and free trade, Bengough wrote a number of political pamphlets such as The Gin Miller Primer (1898). He also published two books of poetry, Motley: Verses Grave and Gay (1895) and In Many Keys (1902). Lecturing was another of Bengough's many skills, and he made several lectures tours across Canada and the United States giving "Chalk Talks"; in 1909 he made a lecture tour of Australia and New Zealand.

Bennett, Louise

  • RC0037
  • Person
  • 1919-2006

Louise Bennett, folklorist, poet, songwriter and performer, was born on 7 September 1919 in Kingston, Jamaica. She studied social work in Jamaica before going to England in 1945 to study at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. She returned to Jamaica in 1947 but in 1950 returned to England where she worked on the BBC. In 1953 she moved to New York City where she performed on radio and on the stage. It was there in 1954 that she married a fellow Jamaican, Eric Coverely. He had been born in 1911 and worked as a draftsman for the Jamaican Government Railway Corporation, as a calligrapher, and also as a theatre performer. In 1955 they returned to Jamaica where she wrote columns for the Gleaner and broadcast her “Miss Lou's views” on the radio using her affectionate nickname. She has published several books of poems and stories and recorded many songs. She was a both a Member of the British Empire and a Member of the Order of Jamaica, and was awarded many honours during her life. She received an honorary degree from York University in 1998; she and her husband had moved to Canada late in life. She died in 2006 and is buried in Jamaica.

Berland, Jayne

  • RC0082
  • Person
  • 1922-2015

Jayne Epstein was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1922 and educated at Wilbur Wright College, Indiana University and the University of Iowa. In 1941 she married Alwyn Berland. The couple had four children. In 1963 she moved to Regina, Saskatchewan, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1973. From 1966 to 1968 she was the poetry editor of the Wascana Review. She and her husband later moved to Hamilton, Ontario where he became the Dean of Humanities at McMaster University and she taught poetry. She published her poems in many journals and also published several books of poetry. She was a founding member of the Hamilton Poetry Centre. In 1988-89 the Berlands travelled to Nanjing, China where they taught English language and literature at the Normal University (NanShaDa). Jayne Berland died in January, 2015, in Dundas, Ontario.

Berton, Pierre

  • RC0052
  • Person
  • 1920-2004

Pierre Francis de Marigny Berton, author, broadcaster and journalist, was born on 12 July 1920 in the Yukon territory, Canada, and was educated at Victoria College and the University of British Columbia. In 1942 he began his career in journalism at the Vancouver News-Herald. After World War II, he briefly wrote features for the Vancouver Sun, as well as beginning a radio career, before joining Maclean's in 1947. He served as managing editor from 1952 to 1958. He left Maclean's to join the Toronto Star as a columnist and associate editor. In 1962 he left the Star briefly for Maclean's and to launch a long career in television with both his own show and as a panelist on "Front Page Challenge".

Berton's books helped to popularize Canadian history for mass audiences. His Klondike: the Life and Death of the Last Great Goldrush (1958) won the Governor General's Award for non-fiction. Two other books by Berton have also won the Governor General's Award. Perhaps his most well-known books, among the many he has written, are his two books about the Canadian Pacific Railways, The National Dream (1970) and The Last Spike (1971). Berton was awarded several honorary degrees, was an officer of the Order of Canada, and chaired the Heritage Canada Foundation. He has published two volumes of autobiography, Starting Out, 1920-1947 (1987) and My Times: Living with History, 1947-1995 (1995). His later publications included Marching As To War (2001), Cats I Have Loved (2002), and his last book, Prisoners of the North (2004). Pierre Berton died on 30 November 2004, survived by his wife Janet.

Birkmyre, Katharine

  • RC0796
  • Person
  • [18--]-[19--]

Katharine Birkmyre was the daughter of Rev. Canon Thomas Skelton (1834-1915). She was married to Henry Birkmyre who was possibly connected to the firm of Birkmyre Brothers, a jute and linen manufacturer. The couple lived at 67 Cadogan Gardens in London.

Blake, Gerald John

  • RC0542
  • Person
  • [1885/6]-1916

Lance Corporal Gerald John Blake (300028) served with the London Rifle Brigade, British Expeditionary Force during the First World War. He was born in 1885 or 1886 to John and Saima Blake of London. He arrived in France in October 1914 and was present for the Christmas truce. Blake died on 1 July 1916, at the age of 30, on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. He is buried at the Thiepval Memorial, Pier 9, face D.

Blum, Sidney

  • RC0006
  • Person
  • [19--]-

Sid Blum was involved in various social welfare and human rights organizations in Canada, including the National Committee on Human Rights.

Blunden, Edmund

  • RC0692
  • Person
  • 1896-1974

Edmund Blunden, English poet and critic, born in London on 1 November 1896. He was educated at Christ's Hospital and Queen's College, Oxford. He spent many years at Oxford University teaching. In 1943 he joined the staff of the Times Literary Supplement. At the time of his death, 20 January 1974, he was a professor at Oxford.

Boesner, Johann-Joseph, Baron de

  • RC0663
  • Person
  • fl.180-

Baron de Boesner was an Austrian banker and perhaps a diplomat. Around 1807 he was in the employ of le comte de la Fare, Bishop of Nancy, for the business affairs of King Louis XVIII in a relation to the court of Vienna.

Boievoi Karandash

  • RC0787
  • Corporate body
  • 1939-

Boievoi Karandash (The Militant Pencil) is an organization in Moscow that sells Soviet art in poster form. The posters were intended to satirize Soviet bureaucracy. The publisher of the posters is Khudozhnik RSFSR, and the series is Na Obcshii sud.

Bolt, Robert

  • RC0677
  • Person
  • 1924-1995

Robert Bolt is an English playwright and screenwriter born in 1924 in Sale, near Manchester, England where he was educated. His most well-known play, A Man for All Seasons, on the life of Sir Thomas More, opened in London in 1960.

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