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Labor-Progressive Party

Identity area

Type of entity

Corporate body

Authorized form of name

Labor-Progressive Party

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1943-1959

History

The Communist Party of Canada was founded in Guelph, Ontario in June 1921 as a secret organization. It became a fully open party in 1924. In 1940 it was banned under the War Measures Act. In 1943 it re-emerged as a "new" party, the Labor-Progressive Party (LPP). The period from 1943-1945 was its most successful, with a claimed membership of 20,000. Tim Buck (1891-1973), a machinist and trade unionist, was general-secretary of the party for thirty-two years although he was forced underground during the 1940-1943 period. He also served as the national leader of the LPP.

The LPP last ran a federal candidate in a December 1958 by-election and nine provincial candidates in the 1959 Ontario election. Following this it returned to Communist Party of Canada name.

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Internal structures/genealogy

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Control area

Description identifier

RC0354

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Draft

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

2015-05-28

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Maintenance notes

A. Wilson