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Fonds RC0168 - Canadian Peace Congress fonds

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Canadian Peace Congress fonds

General material designation

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Title notes

Level of description

Fonds

Reference code

RC0168

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

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Statement of scale (cartographic)

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1937-2001 (Creation)

Physical description area

Physical description

14.05 m of textual records and other material

Publisher's series area

Title proper of publisher's series

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Archival description area

Name of creator

Canadian Peace Congress

Administrative history

The Canadian Peace Congress (CPC) is an organized movement of people and groups in Canada working for peace and supporting the ideals of the United Nations. It is part of the movement led by the World Council of Peace, which itself was formally founded in 1950 after organizing conferences in 1949. The CPC was founded between December of 1948 and May of 1949, as a response to the beginning of the Cold War. The problem regarding the founding date stems from the fact that the original meeting in December 1948 established the Toronto Peace Council, known later as the Toronto Association for Peace, which appointed members to a provisional committee, which in turn organized the first national congress meeting in May 1949. The original meeting was attended by representatives of 47 different organizations and groups, including women's, youth and church groups, trade unions, and ethnic associations. At the subsequent meeting a National Council was set up which elected an executive to run the Congress. The CPC evolved over time to contain various peace councils across Canada as well as affiliated organizations such as the Trade Union Peace Committee, the Communist Party of Canada, the Federation of Russian Canadians and the United Jewish People's Order, to name but a few. The work of the CPC has included organizing conferences to support peace, oppose the arms race, and keep peace issues at the forefront of public attention. Petitions, education, and government lobbying are some of the methods employed by the CPC. In addition, the CPC became closely involved with the Soviet Peace Committee with members of both groups frequently visiting each other's countries. The CPC also maintained a relationship with its Quebec counterpart, Conseil québécois de la paix. The Congress was directed by Chairman James G. Endicott until 1972. He was succeeded by John H. Morgan, who took the title of President and held it until 1986. The final leader of CPC was Lari Prokop. Jean Vantour was Executive Secretary until 1982; she was succeeded by Gordon Flowers who took the title of Executive Director. Although not formally dissolved, the CPC has been very inactive since 1992.

Custodial history

Scope and content

The fonds consists of four accruals. The first accrual (47-1992) measures12.8 m, and is arranged in the following series: administration; campaigns; research files; peace groups; financial records; photographs, posters, and circulars; films, filmstrips, videocassette, and audio cassettes; Toronto Association for Peace. Arrangement is chronological in the administration series with alphabetical ordering within each year, and alphabetical for the following series with some classification ranking. In the administration series some of the material was found in complete disarray. Undated material in a particular year may not belong to that year. The second accrual (07-1995) measures .9 m, and is arranged chronologically in one series, administration. The third accrual (20-2002) measures .2 m, and is arranged in one series, administration and contains constitution and minutes, financial records, correspondence, fund raising and campaigns and publications and affiliations. The fourth accrual (32-2003) measures 15 cm and is arranged in one series, John Hanly Morgan correspondence, and includes minutes, circulars, news clippings, and photographs collected by Morgan. Morgan's original chronological arrangement has been maintained.

Notes area

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

The first accrual was acquired in November 1992 from Gordon Flowers, Secretary-Treasurer of CPC; the second accrual was acquired in 1994 from Flowers and Mischa Korol, a former CPC executive member; the third accrual was acquired in 2002 from Gordon Flowers; the fourth accrual was acquired from John Hanly Morgan, former CPC President and President Emeritus.

Arrangement

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Script of material

Location of originals

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

There are no access restrictions.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

First accrual: Online Finding Aid
Second accrual: Online Finding Aid
Third accrual: Online Finding Aid
Fourth accrual: Online Finding Aid

Associated materials

Researchers may also wish to consult the Toronto Association for Peace fonds.

Related materials

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Other notes

Alternative identifier(s)

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Control area

Description record identifier

RC0168

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